WisRWA Calendar

Oct 06
2018
WisRWA 2018 Fall Workshop
Mark your calendars for the 2018 Fall Workshop on October 5-6, 2018 at the Grand Lodge Waterpark Resort, Rothschild, WI. Registration is now OPEN! For more information, click the Events tab and choose Workshop.
Apr 05
2019
WisRWA 2019 Write Touch Conference
Mark your calendars for the 2019 Write Touch Conference April 5-7, 2019 at the Milwaukee Hyatt in beautiful downtown Milwaukee. The conference will feature Maya Rodale as keynote speaker, and Lisa Cron as one of the headliners. More details to follow!

Meeting Times

Sep 05
2018
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 West 1951 Bond Street in Green Bay

Police Policy and Procedures

See the calendar tab for more details.
Sep 08
2018
Chippewa Falls
10am-12:30 at Deb's Café, 1120 22nd St in Chippewa Falls

Author Business Plan

See the calendar tab for more details.
Sep 08
2018
Wausau
10-12:00 at Marathon County Library 300 North First Street in Wausau

Fall Workshop Prep

See the calendar tab for more details.
Sep 15
2018
Milwaukee
9am-11:30 at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, lower level), Wausatosa

Milwaukee Write-In

See the calendar tab for more details.
Oct 03
2018
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 West 1951 Bond Street in Green Bay

Queries and Pitches

See the calendar tab for more details.
Oct 20
2018
Milwaukee
9am-11:30 at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, lower level), Wausatosa

Milwaukee Write-In

See the calendar tab for more details.
Nov 07
2018
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 West 1951 Bond Street in Green Bay

2019 Planning Meeting

See the calendar tab for more details.
Nov 10
2018
Wausau
10-12:00 at Marathon County Library 300 North First Street in Wausau

2019 Planning Meeting

See the calendar tab for more details.
Nov 17
2018
Milwaukee
9am-11:30 at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, lower level), Wausatosa

2019 Planning Meeting

See the calendar tab for more details.

WisRWA Newsletter



Romance Writing

An “Image System”— Plot or Polish for Deeper Fiction, Deeper POV

Movie directors and cinematographers work with Image Systems to deliver a story and character that entertain and offer meaning.

For those of us writing novels, creative nonfiction, memoir, and short stories, working with an “image system” can “deepen” or improve crucial aspects such as Point of View, characterization, momentum, and theme. Some writers also use an image system as a plotting tool.

Picture of a landscape with a polaroid in the middle showing perspectiveImage System tip 1:  Play with light and shadow more to create special effects and emotion.

  • Check to see if you have too many chapters or scenes starting with a sunny morning or ending with the character going to sleep.
  • Check to see how many scenes are always in the same lighting. Could you vary things more? Use more night-time scenes?
  • Does your character note the light/shadow differences as they enter buildings, rooms, alleys, and other realms?
  • How might darkness or bright light shock your character? Or scare them? Or energize them? Or bring them new knowledge?

Image System tip 2:  Create better and more accurate distance and visual perspectives, as well as sound and smell perspectives.

  • Are you monitoring and varying your close-up camera shots versus long shots?
  • What can your character really see or not from where she or he stands? Do you mistakenly describe eye color but your character couldn’t possibly see that detail from thirty yards away?
  • Smells work the same way. Your character can’t smell a bakery from twenty yards away on a busy street clogged with car exhaust. Within five feet they might be assailed by the cinnamon smell.
  • Sounds have logic as well. At how many feet or yards away do certain sounds appear for your character? How do concrete buildings in a city muffle sounds? Remember that ice, water, and air temperatures affect sounds. Readers will love it if you are accurate about these things.

Image System tip 3:  Contrasting textures signal emotions.

  • The sense of touch is a rich, strong sensation often left out of early drafts of manuscripts, except for that pivotal first touch by lovers perhaps.
  • What information does your character get via the sense of touch of other things, or even via looking at various textures?
  • What texture holds the key to their happiness? Or makes them sad or take action?
  • What texture brings your character fear? Or pain? Or soothing calmness?
  • Where does texture appear in each of your scenes and chapters? Do a “texture outline.” Movie and stage sets are filled with well-designed and chosen textures because we innately feel them as we watch; in novels, the description can take us even deeper and help us experience an emotional reaction via textures old and new.

Image System tip 4:  Interior versus exterior—create momentum. 

  • Movie directors use a constant mix of indoor and outdoor shots. They know the audience becomes bored if five or ten scenes in a row take place indoors, for example.
  • How many of your scenes take place in the interior (or exterior) all in a row or in total for your manuscript?
  • Momentum suffers when characters are in the same place for too long and too many scenes. Readers grow tired of the sameness.
  • What about novels where most or all of the action takes place in a single room? Even that can be exciting if you exploit the concept that there are quadrants in that room and each of those four sections has different values of light, shadow, color, texture, temperature, smell, sound quality, and possibly even taste differences.

Image system tip 5:  Objects matter in every story and help you sell.

  • Directors say that all movies are about the pursuit of an object.
  • In the now-classic novel Plainsong, author Kent Haruf gave teenage Victoria a red purse. What does it symbolize? Haruf did a nifty thing by giving that purse a symbolic, simple plot all its own.
  • Our own novels soar when we imbue an object with symbolism and emotion.
  • What is the object that “matters” in your story?
  • Objects with special emotional or plot meaning usually appear on the cover of a book because marketers know they resonate with readers.

Christine DeSmetChristine DeSmet is a writing coach and instructor with University of Wisconsin-Madison Continuing Studies. She also teaches an online course in novel writing. A past Golden Heart winner and finalist (3 times), her books include three in the Fudge Shop Mystery Series (Penguin Random House) set in Door County, Wis., and the re-issued light romantic mystery novellas When Rudolph Was Kidnapped and Misbehavin’ in Moonstone (Writers Exchange Publishing).

Speak up:

2 comments

| TAGS:

, , , ,

Know Your Whys

The word Why with lots of question marksWithout a doubt, asking who, what, where, when, how are critical to every novel. However, when it comes to your writing, “Why?” is the most important question to ask.

Asking and answering “why?” brings layers to the story. It helps us dig deeper into our characters’ motivations and perspectives. It shows how the past impacts the present. It helps us understand a character’s choices, actions, motivations. It brings meaning to a physical object.

“Why” allows us to cut a beloved sentence or scene. It leads to those “ah-ha!” moments, the surprising moments when you discover something new, unusual, or shocking about your character. In turn, you now have the perfect environment to create a moment that’s completely unexpected.

Recently, a writer friend had me read part of her manuscript. She wrote, “If I leave now, I’ll be home by three o’clock.”

This sentence stood out because I didn’t understand why it was there. What purpose does it serve? Why is getting home by three o’clock important to the story? (She never answered that within her novel.) When I asked her, she said it really didn’t have any importance. She cut it! Do you have sentences like that?

MIT professor and award-winning author, Laura Harrington, said that every word you write in your novel must have muscle. If a scene serves several purposes, even better. Always pay attention to your whys?!

Me Before You author Jojo Moyes once told me that she never regretted anything she cut, only the things she didn’t cut. Think about it: Why is this scene important?

To help you with your writing, I’ve created a WHY list of questions.  Good luck!

By: Liza Wiemer

Liza Wiemer is an award-winning educator with over twenty-five years of teaching experience. Hello?, her debut realistic contemporary YA novel, is set in Door County, Wisconsin and was published by Spencer Hill Press, NY. It was named a Goodreads Best Young Adult Novel and was on Milwaukee County Bestseller’s List for four weeks. Paste Magazine called it “one the most original novels of the year.” In addition, Liza has had two adult non-fiction books published through Random House and Gefen Publishing. Several of her short stories were included in the New York Times bestselling Small Miracles series. A die-hard Packer fan and graduate of UW-Madison, she’s married with two sons. Find her on Twitter: @lizawiemer.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

New Release Tuesday – April 2018

NewReleaseTuesday2

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

 

Book Cover of Phaze by S.C. Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phaze by S.C. Mitchell

 

Book Cover of Loving a Hero by Cheryl Yeko

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loving  a Hero by Cheryl Yeko

 

Book Cover of After All by Laurie Winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After All by Laurie Winter

 

Cover for Betting the Scot by Jennifer Trethewey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Betting the Scot: Highlanders of Balforss Book 2 by Jennifer Trethewey

 

 

 

 

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , , , ,

Building Sandcastles

“’I’m writing a first draft and reminding myself that I’m simply shoveling sand into a box so that later I can build castles.” -Shannon Hale

When I saw this quote late last year, I didn’t realize just how much it would affect my writing from that day forward. It has, however, now become the mantra I chant when I barrel through 5,000-10,000 words a day. That simple sentence changed the way I write… and I’d like to think it’s for the better.

The first novel I wrote took a few years of on and off dabbling. When inspiration struck I wrote a paragraph here, a sentence there, until finally I typed those two magical words. The end. The feeling I had when I finished was a sense of accomplishment unlike any I’d experienced before. I wanted to go back and do it again… to feel the rush of knowing I’d done it. I’d written a novel.

So I started a new one. Again, a paragraph here, a sentence there but always waiting… waiting for inspiration to guide my hand and craft the words into something beautiful. Hours could be spent staring at that damn flashing cursor waiting for that poetic sentence to come together. It was then I saw the quote.

That night I started typing. Fast. I had the story in my head and the characters were off running. Rather than trying to find the perfect words to describe their every move and feeling, I just started pouring words onto the page like a court reporter transcribing everything I saw. I was amazed at how fast the story was unfolding, and how many more layers I could see, smell, and hear when I wasn’t distracted searching for the perfect word. Instead, I was standing inside my story in the middle of the action just scribbling as fast as I could to keep up.

When I was done that night I had typed 11,000 words. There were errors galore. The grammar police would have locked me up and thrown away the key. That road to hell paved with adverbs? I was skipping down it with a grin stretched wide across my face. But even with all the ugliness, I had created something quite beautiful. A story… or at least part of it.

The next day I did the same. Then the next, and the next. In under two weeks my entire novel was done. It wasn’t beautiful… but it was done. The skeleton and skin were laid and now it was time to go back and slap some hair and makeup on that motley looking creature. I was Professor Henry Higgins and my novel was Eliza Doolittle. Charming, but in need of a lot of refinement.

With the story sorted and the scenes set, I was shocked how easy it was to rework my sentences and find those perfect words quite effortlessly that I struggled with before. Perhaps it was because I wasn’t trying to create a story and a sentence all at once. The story was done, now I just needed to add some flourish to it.

Since changing my approach to writing, I am now writing faster than my publisher can keep up. I finished a new novel before they even had time to read the previous one. My “get ‘er done” writing style is not only more enjoyable for me since I get to throw myself into the story, but it has made me much more effective. With this new system, writing a novel is no longer a daunting mountain to climb, but more like small hills I need to jog up and down several times. It’s still the same distance in the end, just broken up into much more manageable pieces.

When I am in a scene, I’m trying my best to write sentences that flow and won’t leave me cringing when I come back through sporting my editor hat. However, when I get tripped up over a word or a phrase I ask myself “Do I need to know this right now or can I come back and figure this out later?” If it’s the latter, which it usually is, I slap down an adverb or an ugly sentence and keep on trucking.

After a particularly long stretch of writing my latest novel, I was in a fight scene and didn’t want to lose my rhythm. When I wasn’t sure how to describe my villain, I threw a sentence in that said “He’s ugly as hell. Work in ways to describe him.” That’s a direct quote. From my novel. Well, it was a direct quote before I went back and edited it to work in a very appropriate description. The point being, rather than lose my momentum by stopping to word-craft, I followed the energy of the story and came back later to pretty it up.

If you find yourself struggling to complete your manuscript, I encourage you to try this technique. Focus on writing the best you can without slamming on the brakes to obsess over what words best describe the color of your hero’s eyes. Just call them blue and move on. Later you can send us swimming in cerulean pools frozen beneath winter’s breath. Just write. Let your story unfold and follow it without delay. When you reach the finish line, take a deep breath, pat yourself on the back, and then sit down in the sand you just shoveled and start building those sandcastles.

Katherine HastingsKatherine Hastings loves love. It’s why she writes romance novels. Getting lost writing a romantic adventure is one of her favorite past times. When she’s s not on an adventure in her mind with her characters, she can be found at her home in Wisconsin snuggling her husband, two Boston Terriers, and the world’s naughtiest cat. Two things make Katherine want to leave her happy home these days…going for rides on her dressage pony or floating at the beach in her big inflatable raft. Writing her novels while floating in the lake is one of her ultimate pleasures…that and Fried Wisconsin Cheese Curds, of course.

Speak up:

1 comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

2018 WisRWA Fab Five Finalists Announced

Fab 5 Contest BadgeWisRWA is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2018 Fabulous Five Contest.

Congratulations to all! The finalists are listed in Alphabetical order, and *** indicates a member of WisRWA. Winners will be announced the week of May 20, 2018.

2018 FAB FIVE FINALISTS

Contemporary
Joy Adare – Mr. Sexy Suit
Natalie Caña*** – Under a Summer Moon
Kate Courtright – It Can’t Be You
C. M. Kerwin – Tender Debt
Sandy Rhodes – Heartbeats of Home

Historical
Jeanine Englert – Queen of Hearts
Theresa Hennessey – A Matter of Manners
Kalinya Parker-Price – The Trouble With Love
Hannah Singerman – Appetites and Vices
Jane Yunker*** – The Healing Heart

Inspirational
Crystal Caudill – Counterfeit Love
Lorri Dudley – The Duke’s Refuge
Loretta Eidson – Fatal Assignment
Eilidh K. Lawrence – Returning With a Secret
C.L. Simon – The Forgiving Tree

Paranormal
Alicia Anthony – Inherent Lies
Carrie Christie – Severed Ties
Laralyn Doran – A Child of Eden
Fenley Grant – Warrior of Eden
Christine Welman*** – Legends

Romantic Suspense
Magda Cavin – Opposing Stock
Meredith Clark – Unconquered
Jeanine Englert – Against the Tide
Lisa Heartman – High Heels and Handguns
Lori Matthews – Break and Enter

Women’s Fiction
Susan Montz Adams – Alchemy of Spirit
Laura Dritlein*** – Possum Trot
Julie M. Mulligan – The Lost Sister
Maggie Smith – Not So Simple
Anne E. Terpstra – Beyond Any Experience

Young Adult/New Adult
Lani Forbes – Virtue and Valor
Eric Frederickson – Wedding Belles
Leonie Kelsall – Echoes Across Time
Wendy Lewis – What Would a Wonder Woman Do?
Jackie Rutherford – It’s all about Sam

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

Promotion Thursday – April 2018

Promotion Thursday - October EditionIt’s Promotion Thursday for March. Check out where you can find our WisRWA authors this month.

Barbara Raffin will present a writing workshop on Using the Underused Senses and be signing books at Kress Family Library, De Pere, WI on April 14th at 10:30 AM-11:45.

Lois Greiman will be signing her books at the Minnesota Horse Expo April 27-29.

S.C. Mitchell will be at UntitledTown on April 21.

Sara Dahmen will be presenting at the Chanticleer Author Conference April 19-22. She will also be hosting a book event/reading on April 25 from 3-4  at Craft Books.

Valerie J. Clarizio, Virginia McCullough, Kira Shayde, S.C. Mitchell, Lisa Romdenne and Mary Grace Murphy will be at UntitledTown presenting a panel entitled  A Look at the Romance Genre and Women’s Fiction – The Genres that Outpace Themselves Year After Year.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

An Interview with Judy Roth from Custom Editing

Before sending their manuscript out into the world, some writers choose to have their work reviewed by a freelance editor. There are several advantages to having an editor join you in the revision process.

Whether you plan on self publishing, pursuing a traditional publisher, or seeking to find an agent, hiring an editor to polish your story is a powerful tool to help present yourself in a professional manner.

After authors dedicate large amounts of time and effort to their manuscripts, it can become hard to see much-needed changes.

As an author, if you are gearing toward establishing a writing career, then working with an editor is a great step toward building a solid foundation to grow from. Not only does an editor polish your work, but you learn as well throughout the editing process.

Judy Roth, Freelance Editor HeadshotI had the privilege of interviewing Judy Roth from Custom Editing. Judy opened the doors for business in 2012. She has been writing and editing for over 20 years. With a New York publishing house background she currently works with a large and diverse group of authors covering most genres of fiction and nonfiction, publishing both traditionally and independently. She takes very seriously the privilege of working with such talented writers—novice and bestselling alike. She is also a conference and writing group workshop leader and thinks she has the best job in the world!

In this article, I have asked Judy some questions about the editing process.

Why is it important for writers to hire an editor to review their manuscript before showing it to the world?

An editor has a practiced eye. She is unbiased and works for you. She has the time, whole days of it often, to devote solely to your work. She has the experience to tell you if something is or isn’t working in a constructive manner and offer concrete examples of how it can be improved if need be. An editor is on your side. She wants you to succeed, and it is her job to help you do so.

What are the most common mistakes you see in a manuscript?

Aside from basic technical errors, I think it’s less about mistakes and more about honing our craft. It’s an ongoing process—an adventure—and a good freelance editor guides authors in this process while respecting authors’ artistic vision.

At what point in the writing process is it a good idea to hire an editor?

The traditional answer is when the manuscript is as done as possible. (When that is, is an entirely different question.) But the beauty of hiring a freelance editor who works for you is that is not always the only answer. An author might want the editor to look at the first few chapters to see if the manuscript is on the right track plot wise and/or style wise. Or, returning to the question of how the writer knows if the manuscript is finished, an editor can help determine that and if need be give suggestions for how to take the story to the next level.

RevisionsHow much time should an author expect to spend on the revision process?

This is an individual process depending on many factors. In any case, it’s important to remember the editing process is as vital as the writing process. With that in mind, try to budget enough time to ensure larger developmental edits are implemented consistently throughout and sentence and paragraph structures are varied and move the story forward. Try to avoid getting bogged down by holding on to something that isn’t working. It could be a plot point that’s dear to you but just feels off in this story. It could be that one perfect sentence that makes you laugh and cry and think deep thoughts, but you’ve moved it to ten different places, and it just no longer works. Let it go—hit delete. It’s actually quite liberating, like cleaning the basement, very satisfying once it’s done, and nine out of ten times we never miss our favorite coat from high school or our kids’ first bikes. And here is the coolest part, it’s no risk. You can hit Undo. If you take it out, you can put it back. It’s your manuscript. And a tip: Keep a separate folder for those wonderful words you have deleted but don’t want to lose. I call mine Hidden Gems. Who knows, those words may come in handy in the next story, or if not you can still go visit them, laugh and cry and marvel at your genius, whenever you want. They are your words!

What advice would you give authors going through the revision process?

Try to keep an open mind and be true to yourself. It sounds obvious, but it’s dang hard to do both at the same time, especially if you are receiving critiques.

And one very practical piece of advice is whenever you make any revision, even as small as a comma change, be sure to read not only the full sentence the revision is in but at a minimum the sentence before and after it as well.

What services do you offer authors?

I edit most fiction and nonfiction. I work with authors who want to publish independently and those who want to spruce up their manuscripts for submission. I offer several different packages of full developmental edits, line edits, and proofreading. I also offer coaching services. And I love talking with writing groups, big and small—always a blast.

What is your favorite part of being an editor?

Oh gosh, I love my job. I meet such talented writers, learn something new every day. I get to look up the most outrageous things on the Internet. Chat with authors about body fluids, who wore breeches, pantaloons, or trousers when, and the merits of an em dash—love ’em. I’m a mamma bear and being an editor I’m able to nurture without ever having to send anyone to timeout, no one gets hurt, and when all is said and done authors actually say, “Thank you.” What could be better than that?

By Lisa Romdenne (w/a Lianna Hawkins)

Lisa Romdenne has been an RWA(PRO) member since November 2014 and a WisRWA member since September 2015. Currently, she serves as President of WisRWA . She writes western romance under the pen name Lianna Hawkins and is presently working on a historical western romance series.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , ,

New Release Tuesday – March 2018

NewReleaseTuesday2

Each month, WisRWA will announce the new books our members have published. We call it New Release Tuesday.

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

 

The Shopkeeper's Secret by Nancy Sweetland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Shopkeeper’s Secret by Nancy Sweetland

 

To Discover a Divine by Tessa McFionn book cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Discover a Divine (Rise of the Stria Book One), by Tessa McFionn

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , ,

The Importance of Setting

We all know there are many important elements that make up a good story. Characterization, plot, and dialogue come immediately to mind. But in doing some research, I’ve discovered I haven’t done enough thinking about Setting.

And it’s so important.

Image looking in at two people in a subway car“Setting is a conscious choice the writer makes during the pre-writing phase,” says John Galligan (author of Tools for Fiction Writers) in an article for the Mystery Writers of America newsletter. “[S]etting feeds and supports your fiction, sometimes in subtle, not evident ways.” He goes on to say that “many of the essentials of setting will show up in your first draft but many more will need to be crafted or refined during revision.”

So, what can we do to improve and use the power of Setting to enhance our work?

Galligan suggests breaking it out into its dimensions:

Place: The most obvious is, of course, where. But there’s more to that; think the whole spectrum of “big” (A city? State? Mythical world?) down to the “microscopic” (a brilliant detail). That’s what we reach for when we revise.

Time: Now we go into the “Scale of When.” Time in history? Time of year? Of life? and of course, Time of story.  We need to seek for those details, lines of dialogue, that clarify the scale of when, that ground the reader in our story.

Mood/Theme: This moves us into a more subliminal mindset. Think big picture (a disaster, maybe a tsunami). Then consider the emotions it causes: despair, loss, horror—a whole spectrum of emotions, evidenced by . . .

Woman sitting on the edge of a boat with flower garlandCharacter: Setting shapes characters in terms of who they are in the beginning of your story and who (in the storyline) they will become. It determines how they walk, talk, eat, think, react—in short, everything. And let’s not forget . . .

Pace: How your story moves from one setting to another. Perhaps your character finds herself uncomfortable—raising the tension—as you skip from one scene to another? Galligan says, “Think of a story as a finite arrangement of settings” that link dramatic actions. “Spending too much time in one and not enough in another creates imbalance and a pacing problem.”

Galligan again: “It all comes down to details and choices. We can’t describe everything.”

I’m paraphrasing here: He advocates striving for consistency, richness and economy, working across details that cross boundaries within Setting, such as describing late summer with “silver maples humming with cicadas.” This not only gives the reader a mental image but at the same time conveys information about place (where) and Mood/Theme.

Whew! Who’d have thought there was so much to consider within the broad word: Setting. I, for one, will go back into the manuscript I’m working on to see how much better it can be with just a few more (or less! Sometimes I’m wordy) detail. I want my story to give my readers so much more than just a place where something happens. I want to give them the depth and height and width that Setting can provide.

Nancy Sweetland has authored seven picture books and a chapter book mystery for young readers, along with short stories for juveniles and adults. Adult novels include The Spa Murders, The Virgin Murders, The Door to Love, WannabeThe House on the Dunes, The Countess of Denwick, and The Shopkeeper’s Secret. She lives in Green Bay, Wisconsin and loves to hear from readers.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , , ,

Oh, Pioneers!

Photograph of Eleanor Hibbert

Eleanor Hibbert

For three years, I had the privilege of working at the public library in the small mid-coast town of Rockland, Maine. I won’t say exactly how long ago it was, but I was young and the classic oak card catalogue and a date stamp machine were not. Over the years, I met many dozens of women who read books by authors on a long list of pioneers; writers who paved the way for all of us in the broad romance genre. My coworkers and I created waiting lists for these authors’ new releases, and in some cases we bought more than one copy, a big deal for an underfunded small town library.

Remember Eleanor Hibbert? Me, neither. But I do remember Victoria Holt, a pioneer in gothic and suspense romance (The Shivering Sands, India Fan); Philippa Carr, author of historical romances (Daughters of England, a 20-book series); and Jean Plaidy, who also wrote historicals. These books were perpetually checked out or on reserve, and some of the shut-in readers would ask me to pick out anything by Holt, Carr, or Plaidy. Another British author, Catherine Cookson (The Lady on my Left, The Bonny Dawn) wrote over 100 books. I recall dragging out glue and tape in our “book ER” as we tried to hold her books together just a little longer. (Cookson suffered a genetic bleeding disorder and other illnesses, which caused great hardship in her life, recounted in a memoir found after her death, Before I Go.)

We also had long waiting lists for books by a Mainer, Elizabeth Ogilvie (The Tide Trilogy), who wrote 40 books for adults and young readers. She lived On Gay’s Island and rarely came to the mainland, but when she agreed to give a talk at the library, her fans showed up in droves. No one could draw a crowd like Ogilvie.

Who can forget Phyllis Whitney (Spindrift, Amethyst Dreams)? In her104 years she wrote 70 books for adults and young people. She was labeled the Queen of American Gothic, but she described her work as “romantic novels of suspense.” Now a subgenre all its own. Born in Japan to American parents, this trailblazer had a penchant for exotic locations. She also wrote A Guide to Writing Fiction—I read this long ago and loved it.

In the 1990s, when I lived in Asheville, North Carolina, I was driving to a speakers’ conference in Florida, but ended up seeing a highway exit sign for St. Simon’s Island, Georgia. Hmm…it sounded vaguely familiar. Curious, I went to have a look and soon realized I was visiting the adopted home of the wildly popular author, Eugenia Price (St. Simon’s Trilogy), and many other books based on historical figures in the region. I ended up visiting the lovely churchyard where she’s buried, now a regular stop for tourists-fans. In a case of serendipity, that day I learned about an annual writers’ conference held on St. Simon’s Island and attended every year thereafter until I moved to Wisconsin in 2001. I later set Island Healing on a fictional version of that island.

When these pioneers began writing, they faced real barriers for women trying to break into the fiction market (let alone garner any respect). Somehow, they took what was a narrow path to success and independence and bulldozed it to make room for all of us. Today, romance, in all its variations, remains the top-selling fiction genre. So, thanks Victoria/Jean/Philippa, Catherine, Elizabeth, Phyllis, and Eugenia…and so many others!

An active member of WisRWA since 2001, Virginia McCullough lives in Green Bay and writes romances for the Harlequin Heartwarming line and award-winning women’s fiction. LOVE, UNEXPECTED, Book 3 of HER Two Moon Bay series, is due out in May. Virginia also writes and edits nonfiction and is a writing coach. Please note: this blog post has been adapted from a post on Heartwarming authors blog, 10-2017.)

Speak up:

4 comments

| TAGS:

, , , ,