WisRWA Calendar

Meeting Times

Oct 07
2017
Green Bay
9:30 - 3:00; Comfort Suites, Green Bay

Join Green Bay members for a FREE Saturday workshop with Colleen Belongea. Colleen is a former LT. for the Green Bay Police Department, she is a Criminal Justice Instructor for NWTC, as well as a State of Wisconsin DOJ Instructor certified to teach in the LE Academy. Colleen will present the following workshops: 1. Women and Law Enforcement…why they get into LE, why they leave, promotions, etc. How to survive in the field, how to build a career in the field, what are quick career killers for women; 2. Defense and Arrest Tactics; and 3. Law enforcement responses & a LE officer’s perspective on the changes in society and challenges for officers. Detailed schedule forthcoming.
Oct 14
2017
Wausau
10:00-12:00 at Marathon County Library (2nd Floor Small Conference Room), 300 N. 1st Street, Wausau, WI

Marketing Continued. Learn how BookFunnel Bundles and Instafreebie can help you with marketing your book.
Oct 21
2017
Milwaukee
9:00-11:30 am at Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, Lower Level)

Polish and Submit Workshop with Cheryl Yeko: Bring your query letter drafts, summaries, author bios, elevator speeches, pitches - whatever you would like to polish. We'll take a look at the whole process of submission and how to keep track of what you send out, the responses, and how to accept a rejection and move on.
Nov 01
2017
Green Bay
11:30 - 3:00; 1951 West Restaurant,1951 Bond St, Green Bay

Planning Meeting for 2018 Area Programs
Nov 11
2017
Chippewa Falls
10:00-12:30; 29 Pines at Sleep Inn & Suites, Eau Claire

Successful Storylines: Bring examples of your favorite, or least favorite, storylines. Why did this one work and that one did not? Are you having trouble with the storyline in your current project? Maybe we can help you brainstorm a fix. If you come away with nothing more than a good time with a group of fun ladies, you win!
Nov 18
2017
Milwaukee
9:00-11:30 am at Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, Lower Level)

Planning Meeting for 2018 Area Programs and First Page Feedback We will be laying out strategy for our 2018 Programming Calendar for the first hour. Bring your ideas and be prepared to brainstorm about what would make for valuable seminars/presentations/talks/workshops. The second half of the meeting will be First Page Feedback. Bring the first page (or first 300 words) of your work-in-progress to read to the group. Members will offer comments about two things that they liked or worked well and one thing that might need improvement. In the past, this has provided our members with a nice boost to their confidence!

WisRWA Newsletter



meeting

Narrating the Book: An Interview with Brian Gill

Professional narrator and actor, Brian Gill, will be at our September meeting to talk about the audio book process, answer your questions, and give you a sample of how your work would soundBrian Gill 2 narrated. So, bring a couple pages of your work-in-progress with you. I’ve known Brian for many years. He is an outstanding actor, excellent narrator, and a dazzlingly charming man. Please come and meet Brian at the MKE WisRWA meeting Saturday, September 16th at 9am in the lower level of the Mayfair Mall.

– Jennifer Rupp, Milwaukee Area Contact

What special skills do you think make you a successful narrator?

I’ve been a professional stage actor for over 20 years, which is a definite help.  I’ve also always had a good ear for dialects and the ability to jump back and forth between several different accents quickly. That is immensely helpful when I’m narrating a book where the author wants a more neutral narrator voice (say for example my own with no accent), then I’ve got a leading man who is British, a leading lady who is French, and a foil who is older and Scottish.

Do you ever get to chat with the author about their vision of the characters?

I will usually receive a character breakdown which gives me the basics along with any tricky pronunciations. Usually all communications are through email, though there’s also been the odd Skype call.

Have you ever gotten completely lost in a story you are narrating?

There was one book I narrated called Wrong Place, Wrong Time by David Purlmutter that was a real nail biter. It was a true story about a hair-raising misadventure he got drawn into when he was a younger man.

Voice Over Microphone with ComputerYou’ve narrated romance novels. Is there anything different required for the romance genre vs. say a thriller?

I’ve found that all of the books I’ve narrated, which include fantasy, non-fiction, noir, and science fiction, share more in common from a narration point of view than differ from each other. I know that I’ll need to use my narrator/storyteller voice for the exposition, then pull out all the stops for the character voices, which includes sometimes an arsenal of accents. Other than that, it is “simply” finding the right tone, pace, and drive for the story telling.

Brian J Gill is a professional stage actor with twenty years of experience, ten of which as a member of Actor’s Equity Association. Gill has performed regionally and internationally and is currently working as an adjunct theatre professor. He collaborates with Griffin Audio Media to produce high quality audio books. You can hear audio sample of Brian J Gill here.

If you’re interested in learning more about Brian’s work and about audio books please join us in Mayfair Mall Community Room (Lower Level) on Saturday, June 18th at 9 AM. We hope to see you there!

 

Jennifer Tretheweyby: Jennifer Rupp

Jennifer Rupp is the Area Contact for Milwaukee Chapter of WisRWA. She writes under the name of Jennifer Trethewey. Cassie Hanjian of Waxman Leavell Literary Agency in New York represents her Highland House historical romance series. Jennifer has placed in the SOLA Dixie Kane Memorial Contest, Indiana’s Golden Opportunity Contest, and WisRWA’s Fab Five Contest. She’s a member of Wisconsin RWA, a PRO member of RWA, Red Oak Writing Studio, and Wisconsin Writers Association.

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Book Launch Parties: The Hows and Whys

WisRWA members, Mia Jo Celeste, author of Other Than, and Barbara M.  Britton, author of Providence and Building Benjamin, will be talking about book launch parties (both actual and virtual) at the June WisRWA meeting in Milwaukee. Jennifer Rupp asked them a few questions about their first year as published authors.Brenda Nelson-Davis

 

Jen: Brenda and Barbara, you’ve both released your debut novels within the last twelve months. Did it come as a shock how involved you would have to be in the marketing of your own book?

Brenda: Yes. Although I’d heard a lot about marketing, taken some classes and been a blogger for years, I was surprised about the time and financial commitment. That said, I like marketing—something I never imagined I would.

Barbara: Yes, definitely. Publishing has changed so much since I started my journey ten years ago. I knew I would have a hand in marketing my books, but I didn’t know I would be the driving force behind getting the word out about my novels.

 

Barbara M. BrittonJen: About how much time per week do you spend actively marketing, engaging in social media, updating your website, blogging, etc.?

Brenda: It varies. Usually I check Twitter and Facebook every couple of days and I’ve been trying to appear in cyberspace a couple of times a week, either on my blog or someone else’s. For me, it’s a lot like student teaching. Because so many tasks are new, they take longer to figure out and complete, but I’m sure that I’ll get faster and I’ll figure out which tasks are the most important to complete.

Barbara: I feel I do some sort of marketing every day because of social media. Certainly I am more involved right before, during, and after a release. With Pelican Book Group, I have an e-book release date that is different than my print release date. Twice the fun—and work. I would say my average is 5-10 hours a week.

 

Jen: Now that you’re a published author, do you write with more confidence?

Brenda: I hope the adage “practice makes perfect” works. Because I write more, I’m more comfortable writing and, God willing, my writing is getting better.

Barbara: Yes and no. I feel I have the basic craft of writing down pat, but doubts plague me as a published writer. I’m thinking my work isn’t good enough, or my success was a fluke. I have to silence those nasty voices and tell myself that I am writing solely for myself. If no one sees my book, that’s okay. I’ve enjoyed writing it and learning through my research.

 

To hear more from Brenda and Barbara, please join us at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, Lower Level) on June 17 from 9-11:30 AM. It’s sure to be a great time.

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Milwaukee Area February Meeting – Love Scenes with Laura Zats

Join the Milwaukee area as they welcome literary agent Laura Zats of Red Sofa Literary.  Laura will give live critiques of love scenes.  Not a WisRWA member, but interested in seeing what we’re about? You’re invited to join us too. See all the details below.

Milwaukee Area February Meeting

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Chippewa Falls February Meeting – Revisions from Hell

Join the Chippewa Falls Area meeting this month as they tackle Candace Havens’s Revisions From Hell. It will piggy back on what was learned during the January meeting.This program is open to WisRWA members from anywhere in the state. Not a WisRWA member, but interested in seeing what we’re about? You’re invited to join us too. See all the details below.

February Chippewa Falls Meeting - Revisions from hell

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Writing and Social Media: An Interview with Rochelle Melander

Rochelle Melander -WriteNow CoachAuthor, professional certified coach, and teacher Rochelle Melander has helped thousands of people overcome writer’s block, write more, turn their ideas into books, navigate the publishing world, and use speaking and social media to reach their readers. She’s the author of ten books, including the National Novel Writing Month guide—Write-A-Thon: Write Your Book in 26 Days (and Live to Tell About It).  She will be the featured speaker at the Milwaukee area meeting on January 21, 2017.  Milwaukee Area Contact, Jennifer Rupp, spoke with Rochelle about social media and it’s importance to a writer’s platform.

How important do you think Social Media is to marketing your brand or your novels?

Social media provides unique opportunities for writers and readers to connect. Before social media, authors had to travel to bookstores and libraries to meet readers. Fans who lived in remote areas rarely had an opportunity to connect with authors. Social media transformed all of that. Now, anyone can connect with their favorite authors. And writers can build relationships with their fan base. And that’s crucial in today’s publishing world.

Publishers are spending less time and money marketing their books. Indie publishing has flooded the market with books. Authors need to use multiple tools to connect with readers and sell books. Social media marketing is an essential part of any marketing plan.

That said, authors need to use social media in multiple ways. In addition to research and building connections with other authors and publishing professionals, authors can use social media to develop relationships with readers and market their books.

As a coach, I recommend that writers spend more time building relationships with readers than promoting their books. Authors who focus solely on self-promotion can annoy colleagues and readers. And I’ve heard several agents say that a negative social media reputation is worse than none at all.

 

Approximately how much time per week or per day would you recommend investing in Social Media marketing or promotion?

This depends on the writer and their current social media goals. When writers are pre-publication or between publications, I recommend they use social media to:

  • Study their market
  • Learn about their readers
  • Build relationships with readers
  • Connect with colleagues
  • Connect with publishing professionals

During a book marketing cycle, authors might participate in a blog tour, advertise on various sites, run book giveaways, offer freebies to readers, and more.

I recommend that writers set a social media goal for the week or month, depending on what task they’re working on. Then, they can set aside time each day to work on these goals. For a writer who wants to build their platform, I would recommend spending a couple of hours strategizing. Once they have a social media plan, they can schedule time each day to accomplish their goals.

For a writer who is simply building a platform, I think 15-30 minutes a day is a reasonable amount of time to spend connecting on social media. For writers who are in a marketing cycle—promoting a book or other product—they might spend an hour or more a day working on social media. Of course, tools like Hootsuite and Buffer can increase one’s efficiency and save time.

 

How do you reach or convince authors who might resist the use of Social Media?

Most authors resist social media because they feel overwhelmed. They might feel comfortable with one tool, like Facebook, but confused by Twitter or Instagram. I encourage authors to begin by building relationships on a single social media site. Once they feel comfortable on that site and see the results it offers, they’re more willing to try other sites.

 

How has social media helped you?

I’ve been publishing books for a long time, all through traditional publishers. Since social media, my sales have increased and my network has expanded. Readers who were fans before social media have sought me out on Facebook and Twitter and connected with me. I’ve developed new readers around the world through my presence on Twitter and other social media sites. I’ve also been able to connect with some of my favorite authors, building a wonderful network of colleagues.

 

What other kind of work do you do with authors?

My work with authors falls into three categories: supporting their process, strategizing around their product, and editing their work. Many authors come to me because they feel blocked or frustrated by the writing process. They have ideas but can’t find the time to write or overcome their fears and self-doubt. I’ve discovered that there are no blanket solutions. I work with each author to evaluate their situation, understand their particular blocks, and discover a solution that will help them write more. I also work extensively with nonfiction authors who need help planning books that boost their business. Other authors approach me to strategize their publishing and marketing plans. We work together to craft query letters or book proposals, develop a social media marketing plan, and connect with readers. Finally, I also do developmental editing for both novels and nonfiction books, supporting writers in creating books that sell.

 

We hope you will join us for Rochelle’s program on Writing and Social Media. She will be speaking at the Milwaukee area WisRWA meeting on January 21, 2017  in the Community Room at Mayfair Mall.  To learn more about Rochelle Melander, visit her online at writenowcoach.com and follow her on Twitter (@WriteNowCoach).

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