WisRWA Calendar

Apr 05
2019
WisRWA 2019 Write Touch Conference
Mark your calendars for the 2019 Write Touch Conference April 5-7, 2019 at the Milwaukee Hyatt in beautiful downtown Milwaukee. The conference will feature Maya Rodale as keynote speaker, and Lisa Cron as one of the headliners. Registration is now open.

Meeting Times

Oct 20
2018
Milwaukee
9am-11:30 at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, lower level), Wausatosa

Goal, Motivation, Conflict

See the calendar tab for more details.
Nov 07
2018
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 West 1951 Bond Street in Green Bay

2019 Planning Meeting

See the calendar tab for more details.
Nov 10
2018
Wausau
10-12:00 at Marathon County Library 300 North First Street in Wausau

2019 Planning Meeting

See the calendar tab for more details.
Nov 17
2018
Milwaukee
9am-11:30 at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, lower level), Wausatosa

2019 Planning Meeting

See the calendar tab for more details.

WisRWA Newsletter



Jane Yunker

Social Media for Writers

On Saturday, February 10th, Karissa Zastrow spoke to the Chippewa Falls area group about using social media to promote their careers. The event was well attended by the area group as well as the public. It was held in the community room at Volume One in Eau Claire, a wonderful local book store that also sells a variety of products from the area.

Karissa’s emphasis was on quality over quantity. Pick two or three that best suit your writing and do them well. With this in mind, she concentrated her presentation on perhaps the three most popular social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. She started with a basic overview on how to use each site and then offered tips on how to be professional; tips that apply themselves to all responsible social media use.

Schedule your posts: This can mean using one of the applications that allows you to compose your post in advance and then schedule when and where you’d like it to appear; but she warned these aren’t always reliable, so be careful. You might also use a personal assistant to post for you, just don’t forget to

also post for yourself. Your followers want to hear from you! She suggested you calendar a day and time when you routinely post for each site so you neither neglect nor overwhelm your followers. Be consistent, but flexible.

Think before you post! Just as it’s wise that we think before we speak, we should think before we post. How does it read? Not how do you want it to read, but how does it actually read. Without facial clues and voice inflection a post, like an email or text, can be construed completely different than intended. And, unless you’re writing is political in

nature and you’re looking to be provocative, it’s probably best that you not let yourself be caught up in a sparring match during these divisive times. The same goes for photos or memes or reposts. Followers are drawn to graphics. Use them! They may enjoy pictures of a beautiful sunset from your Cabo vacation, but it’s not a good idea to include the photo of you and your friends doing drunken karaoke. If the post or photo is something you’d warn your teenager not to post because a future employer might see it, the rule goes for you, too.

Think of the editor or agent perusing your media presence as a potential future employer.

Book promotion: A good rule to follow is one promotion for every five posts. This goes the same for cross-promotion. Promotion, for yourself or someone else, is important, but if you come across as someone only interested in getting people to buy, buy, buy, they will stop following you. Your followers want to feel like they know you as a person. Tell them about an interesting hobby, your pet, a favorite author or quote. Everyone loves a funny story. Tell them what you’re reading now. Recommend a new restaurant or share a fabulous recipe your hubby or kids just couldn’t get enough of last night. Be human, not a sales bot. But by all means, when you have a release date get it out there! Just don’t hit them over the head with it.

What I found most interesting, and intend to participate in, is a Twitter pitch party called #PitMad. It’s a great way to get your pitch out in front of multiple editors and agents.

Jane YunkerNew to romance writing, Jane Yunker has been a WisRWA member since 2015 and the Chippewa Falls area contact since 2016. She is a blogger, published poet, and published short fiction writer. She recently completed her first full-length romance novel, “Mary Bishop,” which finaled in the 2016 Fab Five Contest historical category, and has started work on her second. She grew up in Wisconsin but spent almost thirty years living in Rochester, New York, before returning to Wisconsin in 2011. She currently lives in St Croix Falls with her husband.

Jane is also a member of the Wisconsin Writers Association (WWA), the Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets (WFOP), The Northern Lakes Writers Guild, and the St Croix Falls Historical Society archival committee.

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The Origin of Valentine’s Day

1900s Valentine PostcardI love history. I write historical fiction. I have a degree in American History. And, I’ve always been fascinated in the origin of things. St. Valentine and Cupid, one real and one a myth, are the two figures most closely associated with Valentine’s Day. Who was St. Valentine? The answer to that question is unclear.

The Catholic Church recognizes three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all martyred. One was a priest who served in the third century Roman army. Emperor Claudius II believed single men made better soldiers, men not distracted by a wife and family, so he made it illegal for his young soldiers to marry. Legend has it this soldier priest defied the decree by secretly officiating at the marriage of young soldiers who had fallen in love. When the emperor learned of this, he ordered Valentine put to death. Other legends suggest Valentine, while imprisoned and awaiting his execution, may have been killed helping Christians escape from the tortures of Roman prisons. According to another legend he actually composed and sent the first “Valentine” after falling in love with a young girl, perhaps his jailor’s daughter, who visited him regularly. He is supposed to have signed his greeting “From your Valentine”. The one thing the legends all have in common is the portrayal of Valentine as a sympathetic, romantic hero. By the Middle Ages, Valentine would become one of the most popular saints in England and France.

Perhaps the most familiar symbol of Valentine’s Day is Cupid, that fat little winged angel with the arrows that supposedly cause their target to fall in love. This vision of Cupid, son of Venus, Goddess of Love, comes from Roman mythology. However, Greek mythology envisioned Cupid much differently.

Cupid_and_Psyche_(Boston_Public_Library)

By L. Prang & Co. (publisher) (Flickr: Cupid and Psyche) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Eros, the son of Aphrodite, Greek Goddess of Love, was a handsome young man who made the mistake of falling in love with a mortal woman, Psyche, said to be even more beautiful than his jealous mother. Aphrodite sent a plague to Earth and made it known the only way to end the suffering was to sacrifice Psyche. The King, Psyche’s father, bound her and left her to be devoured by a fearsome monster. Eros rescued Psyche and married her. His one requirement, though, was that his bride never see his face. This did not bother Psyche as she was happy with her husband who was a wonderful lover by night and left her to live in unimaginable luxury by day. Unfortunately, Psyche had two sisters who were just as jealous of their sister’s beauty as was Aphrodite. They convinced Psyche her husband must in truth be a horrible monster. So one night Psyche lit a candle to see for herself. Instead of something ugly and fearsome, she saw the face of a god. As Psyche gazed at the sleeping Eros, her candle dripped hot wax and he awoke. Angry at her betrayal, Eros flew away. Devastated, Psyche begged her mother-in-law for another chance. Aphrodite set Psyche on a quest to complete four tasks in order to win back Eros’ love. Psyche managed to accomplish the first three tasks with the help of ants, a reed, and an eagle, but the fourth task became her downfall. Aphrodite sent Psyche to the underworld to steal a box of Persephone’s beauty cream. Again with help, Psyche found the entryway to the underworld and snuck past the guards Charon and Cerberus; but, as Aphrodite predicted would happen, Psyche could not resist the temptation to open the box. Psyche reasoned that if the most perfect goddess Aphrodite could be made even more beautiful by this cream, imagine what it would do for her, an imperfect mortal. Upon opening the box, Psyche fell into a deathlike sleep. With the help of Zeus, Eros brought his sleeping wife to Olympus, where she was given nectar and ambrosia and thus made immortal. On Olympus, in the presence of the other gods, Aphrodite was forced to accept Psyche as her daughter-in-law. Psyche would soon give birth to a daughter named Pleasure.

In Latin the word Cupid means “desire”, that emotion celebrated on February 14th with cards, flowers, candy…perhaps that much-anticipated ring. Desire…it’s what romance writers struggle to create for our readers every day.

May your lives be filled with the love and desire promised by the gods, St Valentine, and Cupid. Not just on Valentine’s Day, but every day.

Jane YunkerNew to romance writing, Jane Yunker has been a WisRWA member since 2015 and the Chippewa Falls area contact since 2016. She is a blogger, published poet, and published short fiction writer. She recently completed her first full-length romance novel, “Mary Bishop,” which finaled in the 2016 Fab Five Contest historical category, and has started work on her second. She grew up in Wisconsin but spent almost thirty years living in Rochester, New York, before returning to Wisconsin in 2011. She currently lives in St Croix Falls with her husband.

Jane is also a member of the Wisconsin Writers Association (WWA), the Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets (WFOP), The Northern Lakes Writers Guild, and the St Croix Falls Historical Society archival committee.

 

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Chippewa Falls February Meeting – Revisions from Hell

Join the Chippewa Falls Area meeting this month as they tackle Candace Havens’s Revisions From Hell. It will piggy back on what was learned during the January meeting.This program is open to WisRWA members from anywhere in the state. Not a WisRWA member, but interested in seeing what we’re about? You’re invited to join us too. See all the details below.

February Chippewa Falls Meeting - Revisions from hell

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Lonely vs Being Alone – Fall Into Fiction Workshop

Fall Into Fiction WorkshopWe all know what it’s like to feel lonely. You can be in a room full of friends and family, people you love, and still feel lonely. They can all be talking, laughing, having a good time, and you feel like you’re outside looking in through glass. Being lonely is not the same as being alone.

Being alone is taking a much needed break from everything outside ourselves. It’s going for a long walk. It’s reading a really good book without interruption or making a jigsaw puzzle while watching a movie marathon. We all need a day like this now and then, a day where we can shut out all the worries and concerns of our everyday life. Doesn’t matter how you unwind, the point is we all need to unwind…alone.

As writers we cherish our alone time, hoard it hungrily and protect it with the ferocity of a well-trained watch dog. This is the time we can most clearly hear our characters speak to us. This is the time we can let our muse take over our thoughts, the time we can allow our plot to percolate through our brains and out our fast-typing fingertips. Writers are by nature solitary creatures. Oh, we do seek each other out from time to time to compare notes, share tips of the trade, and to reassure ourselves that we aren’t truly alone because all mankind has succumbed to a zombie apocalypse except for us and we somehow missed it while we were being alone. It’s why I belong to a number of writers’ organizations and critique groups. These are the people who help me remember WHY I write. Conferences and workshops are an excellent opportunity to not be alone.

My Chippewa Falls area of WisRWA is sponsoring a one-day Fall Into Fiction Workshop, on Saturday, October 8th, and I’m looking forward to meeting others who feel the creative urge the way I do. I’m hoping to put some faces to the names.

Come join us at The Plaza Hotel & Suites, 1202 W. Clairmont Ave, Eau Claire to hear journalist, author, and editor Candace Havens speak. In the morning it’s about “The Book Map: Plotting Your High Concept Ideas,” and in the afternoon “Fast Draft and Revision Hell.” (We all know what that’s about, right!?) Arrive early and join us for book signings and a pizza party Friday night.

I hope to see you there, but hurry! Seats are limited and I wouldn’t want you to miss out on this wonderful opportunity to not be “alone” on October 8th.

Find out more about the Fall Into Fiction Workshop, or register online.

Jane Yunkerby WisRWA member Jane Yunker – this blog originally appeared at www.janeyunkerauthor.com.

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