WisRWA Calendar

May 19
2017
2017 WisRWA Conference
May 19 - 21, 2017
Green Bay, Wisconsin

Featuring best-selling authors Christie Craig, Virginia Kantra, and Sarah MacLean.

Register now under the Conference tab!

Meeting Times

Mar 03
2017
Green Bay
11:30-3:00 - 1951 West Restaurant,1951 Bond St, Green Bay

The Haves and Have-Nots of Website Design for Today's Author: Join Elle J. Rossi of EJR Digital for an interactive discussion on author websites. What works? What doesn't? Learn how to get the most bang for your buck and hear new ideas on how to engage readers at your cyber home.

**Please note this is a FRIDAY, not our usual 1st Wed. of the month.**
Mar 11
2017
Chippewa Falls
10:00 to 12:30, 29 Pines at the Sleep Inn & Suites Conference Center, 5872 33rd Ave. (on Hwy 29), Eau Claire

Whether you’re drafting your first novel or making edits on your twentieth, we all battle the same enemy…TIME. How can we be expected to write with all the demands of social media, contracts and bookkeeping, day jobs and families? Come share your ideas and hear ours.
Mar 11
2017
Wausau
10:30-12:30 - Vino Latte 700 Grand Ave, Wausau

 Character Excavation, presented by Kristan Higgins, Farrah Rochon, Damon Suede from 2016 RWA National Conference: "In this session, the speakers will drill down past arcs and stereotypes into what makes fictional folks burn and shimmer on the page. They'll also unpack some helpful tools: the power of deep characterization to structure your story, how to skirt the swamps of backstory and the traps of tropes, and the source of that essential spark that brings fictional folks to life (and love) on the page."
Mar 18
2017
Milwaukee
9:00-11:30 - Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, Lower Level)

TRENDS IN PUBLISHING: Daniel Goldin of Boswell Book Company says, “I think you can call the talk A bookseller's take on trends in publishing," and yes, he pays attention to things going on outside his bookstore. Daniel will talk about the relationships between publisher/bookstore and novelist/bookstore, as well as field questions about book launches and readings.

WisRWA Newsletter



Revisions: Tips to Polish Your WIP

RevisionsIt’s hard, yet it’s the difference between a sale and “not for us.”

James Michener once said, “I’m not a very good writer, but I’m an excellent rewriter.”

I think that’s where most of us are, which might be why many writing gurus like Anne Lamott encourage bad first drafts, but we won’t talk about those today. Instead, I’ll focus on revision. I’d like to share my top three tips.

First, put some time between your drafts. At least a few days. A week or a month or two might be better. Most of us fall in love with our stories and we need that infatuation to ebb, so we can read our work without the rosy-everything’s awesome glasses. A little time gives us the emotional distance to view work anew and figure out what’s missing and what might need to change.

Second, have someone else read your work before you upload or send it off to be discovered. Critique partners or first readers can catch story inconsistencies and areas that aren’t understandable in your work. They can tell you which characters they connect to or which one they really don’t understand. Also, they can spot spelling or grammar errors.

At a writer’s conference I attended a copy editor admitted that even she makes mistakes occasionally and when she does, she doesn’t let it bother her because she figures it takes an average of sixteen pairs of eyes to get a manuscript to published flawlessness. Your critique buddies can be one of those first sets of editing eyes. Also, one of the best things about having critique partner or group is that you can become great friends.

My third tip is to try for good or very good instead of perfect. Because being human, and not possessing sixteen sets of eyes yourself, a totally perfect scene or manuscript is unattainable. Too much revision may add hours to your tasks and if you’re like me—it’s a buzz kill. It ruins the fun. So, my advice—do the best you can, look your work over a few times and then stop. Good is good enough.

When I’m not writing, I’m teaching, and I fit the one of the instructor stereotypes. I ask my students to re-think their drafts and to revise more than once. Revision and re-evaluating life decisions are themes that frequently appear in my fiction.

Mia Jo Celesteby: Mia Jo Celeste

Mia Jo Celeste comes from a family of writers and English teachers, so it was no surprise that she decided to pursue both careers. She’s an adjunct instructor, who just published her first release, Other Than, your grandma’s Gothic romance gone uber.

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2 Responses to “Revisions: Tips to Polish Your WIP”

  1. Kate MacEachern says:

    I like them all and love the third tip, especially. Not stressing over perfect, which never arrives…

  2. Tawnya Perry says:

    Mia,
    Thank you for your tips. I’m going to follow your advice. I just finished writing my first novel and completing two minor drafts. I know that I need to temporarily part ways with my beloved characters. I’ll revisit them again at a later time, when I can be more objective. I will be happy with very good. We are all a revision of our previous selves.

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