WisRWA Calendar

Oct 06
2018
WisRWA 2018 Fall Workshop
Mark your calendars for the 2018 Fall Workshop on October 5-6, 2018 at the Grand Lodge Waterpark Resort, Rothschild, WI. For more information, click the Workshop tab.
Apr 05
2019
WisRWA 2019 Write Touch Conference
Mark your calendars for the 2019 Write Touch Conference April 5-7, 2019 at the Milwaukee Hyatt in beautiful downtown Milwaukee. The conference will feature Maya Rodale as keynote speaker, and Lisa Cron as one of the headliners. More details to follow!

Meeting Times

May 02
2018
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 West 1951 Bond Street, Green Bay

Deep Point of View

As authors, we hear it all the time - but what does it really mean, and how can we incorporate it into our novels? Join us as we find out!
May 12
2018
Chippewa Falls
10-12:30 at Deb's Café 1120 122nd Street, Chippewa Falls

Conference Preparation

Conferences are a great opportunity to meet other writers, learn about craft, and of course, meet and pitch to editors and agents. Come and learn how to get the most out of your conference experience!
May 12
2018
Wausau
10-12:00 at Marathon County Library 300 North First Street, Wausau

Using Canva to Help Market Your Books and your Brand

Want to learn how to design memes? Lyn Cote and Amy Sandas will teach us the ins and outs of Canva, a program that enables anyone to become a designer!
May 19
2018
Milwaukee
9am-11:30 at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, lower level), Wauwatosa

Stress Relief for Writers

Join our authors as we hunker down to write, share ideas, and brainstorm to solve any roadblocks we've met. WisRWA member Vicky Hinshaw will focus on Stress Relief for Authors.

WisRWA Newsletter



Members

New Release Tuesday – April 2018

NewReleaseTuesday2

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

 

Book Cover of Phaze by S.C. Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phaze by S.C. Mitchell

 

Book Cover of Loving a Hero by Cheryl Yeko

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loving  a Hero by Cheryl Yeko

 

Book Cover of After All by Laurie Winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After All by Laurie Winter

 

 

 

 

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , , ,

Building Sandcastles

“’I’m writing a first draft and reminding myself that I’m simply shoveling sand into a box so that later I can build castles.” -Shannon Hale

When I saw this quote late last year, I didn’t realize just how much it would affect my writing from that day forward. It has, however, now become the mantra I chant when I barrel through 5,000-10,000 words a day. That simple sentence changed the way I write… and I’d like to think it’s for the better.

The first novel I wrote took a few years of on and off dabbling. When inspiration struck I wrote a paragraph here, a sentence there, until finally I typed those two magical words. The end. The feeling I had when I finished was a sense of accomplishment unlike any I’d experienced before. I wanted to go back and do it again… to feel the rush of knowing I’d done it. I’d written a novel.

So I started a new one. Again, a paragraph here, a sentence there but always waiting… waiting for inspiration to guide my hand and craft the words into something beautiful. Hours could be spent staring at that damn flashing cursor waiting for that poetic sentence to come together. It was then I saw the quote.

That night I started typing. Fast. I had the story in my head and the characters were off running. Rather than trying to find the perfect words to describe their every move and feeling, I just started pouring words onto the page like a court reporter transcribing everything I saw. I was amazed at how fast the story was unfolding, and how many more layers I could see, smell, and hear when I wasn’t distracted searching for the perfect word. Instead, I was standing inside my story in the middle of the action just scribbling as fast as I could to keep up.

When I was done that night I had typed 11,000 words. There were errors galore. The grammar police would have locked me up and thrown away the key. That road to hell paved with adverbs? I was skipping down it with a grin stretched wide across my face. But even with all the ugliness, I had created something quite beautiful. A story… or at least part of it.

The next day I did the same. Then the next, and the next. In under two weeks my entire novel was done. It wasn’t beautiful… but it was done. The skeleton and skin were laid and now it was time to go back and slap some hair and makeup on that motley looking creature. I was Professor Henry Higgins and my novel was Eliza Doolittle. Charming, but in need of a lot of refinement.

With the story sorted and the scenes set, I was shocked how easy it was to rework my sentences and find those perfect words quite effortlessly that I struggled with before. Perhaps it was because I wasn’t trying to create a story and a sentence all at once. The story was done, now I just needed to add some flourish to it.

Since changing my approach to writing, I am now writing faster than my publisher can keep up. I finished a new novel before they even had time to read the previous one. My “get ‘er done” writing style is not only more enjoyable for me since I get to throw myself into the story, but it has made me much more effective. With this new system, writing a novel is no longer a daunting mountain to climb, but more like small hills I need to jog up and down several times. It’s still the same distance in the end, just broken up into much more manageable pieces.

When I am in a scene, I’m trying my best to write sentences that flow and won’t leave me cringing when I come back through sporting my editor hat. However, when I get tripped up over a word or a phrase I ask myself “Do I need to know this right now or can I come back and figure this out later?” If it’s the latter, which it usually is, I slap down an adverb or an ugly sentence and keep on trucking.

After a particularly long stretch of writing my latest novel, I was in a fight scene and didn’t want to lose my rhythm. When I wasn’t sure how to describe my villain, I threw a sentence in that said “He’s ugly as hell. Work in ways to describe him.” That’s a direct quote. From my novel. Well, it was a direct quote before I went back and edited it to work in a very appropriate description. The point being, rather than lose my momentum by stopping to word-craft, I followed the energy of the story and came back later to pretty it up.

If you find yourself struggling to complete your manuscript, I encourage you to try this technique. Focus on writing the best you can without slamming on the brakes to obsess over what words best describe the color of your hero’s eyes. Just call them blue and move on. Later you can send us swimming in cerulean pools frozen beneath winter’s breath. Just write. Let your story unfold and follow it without delay. When you reach the finish line, take a deep breath, pat yourself on the back, and then sit down in the sand you just shoveled and start building those sandcastles.

Katherine HastingsKatherine Hastings loves love. It’s why she writes romance novels. Getting lost writing a romantic adventure is one of her favorite past times. When she’s s not on an adventure in her mind with her characters, she can be found at her home in Wisconsin snuggling her husband, two Boston Terriers, and the world’s naughtiest cat. Two things make Katherine want to leave her happy home these days…going for rides on her dressage pony or floating at the beach in her big inflatable raft. Writing her novels while floating in the lake is one of her ultimate pleasures…that and Fried Wisconsin Cheese Curds, of course.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

Promotion Thursday – April 2018

Promotion Thursday - October EditionIt’s Promotion Thursday for March. Check out where you can find our WisRWA authors this month.

Barbara Raffin will present a writing workshop on Using the Underused Senses and be signing books at Kress Family Library, De Pere, WI on April 14th at 10:30 AM-11:45.

Lois Greiman will be signing her books at the Minnesota Horse Expo April 27-29.

S.C. Mitchell will be at UntitledTown on April 21.

Sara Dahmen will be presenting at the Chanticleer Author Conference April 19-22. She will also be hosting a book event/reading on April 25 from 3-4  at Craft Books.

Valerie J. Clarizio, Virginia McCullough, Kira Shayde, S.C. Mitchell, Lisa Romdenne and Mary Grace Murphy will be at UntitledTown presenting a panel entitled  A Look at the Romance Genre and Women’s Fiction – The Genres that Outpace Themselves Year After Year.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New Release Tuesday – March 2018

NewReleaseTuesday2

Each month, WisRWA will announce the new books our members have published. We call it New Release Tuesday.

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

 

The Shopkeeper's Secret by Nancy Sweetland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Shopkeeper’s Secret by Nancy Sweetland

 

To Discover a Divine by Tessa McFionn book cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Discover a Divine (Rise of the Stria Book One), by Tessa McFionn

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , ,

Promotion Thursday – March 2018

Promotion Thursday - October EditionIt’s Promotion Thursday for March. Check out where you can find our WisRWA authors this month.

 

Barbara M. Britton will be at The Columbus Books & Beer Book Club at the Black Kettle Pub in Columbus, WI on March 22nd at 7 p.m.

Lois Greiman will be presenting the workshop Beyond the Honeymoon with Michele Hauf at the Rosemount Writers Festival on March 24th. They will also be accepting manuscripts for critique.

Cheryl Yeko will be on Tina Blog Talk Radio on the March 13, 2018 at 3:00 PM EDT. She will also be teaching the course Your Novel’s Blue Print at SavvyAuthors from March 12-23.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , , ,

Fabulous Five Contest Author Critique: Barbara Raffin

The 27th Annual Fabulous Five contest for unpublished authors and authors not published in book length fiction in the last five years is open for entries. WisRWA is pleased to be able to offer entrants of the 2018 Fabulous Five contest a chance to win one of eight detailed critiques from a published WisRWA author. We wanted to introduce everyone to each of these authors, and share a little bit about their writing journey. Without further ado, please meet our final author: Barbara Raffin.

Headshot of Barbara RaffinBarbara grew up a country girl on the Michigan-Wisconsin border, but loves to visit the big city and live the hurried pace now and then. Blessed with a vivid imagination, she’s created stories and adventures in one form or another for as long as she can remember. Whether a romantic romp or gothic-flavored paranormal, her books have one common denominator: characters who are wounded, passionate, and searching for love. Her books will make you laugh and cry.

WISRWAHow long have you been writing? Can you tell us a little about your journey to publication?

BARBARA: I wrote my first book at the age 12 — a zillion years ago. I didn’t write seriously until I was in my 30s.

It hasn’t been an easy journey to publication. I have a hard time fitting into a category. I published first in e-publishing, seeing it as the future in books, I’ve been contracted by a few small presses and am currently trying out the indie market.

Book Cover for The Visitor by Barbara RaffinWISRWAWhat is something that you learned along the way that proved to be a light bulb moment and still is relevant to your writing today?

BARBARA: The importance of dialogue clicked with me when I read Elizabeth Lowell’s Only Love. Prior to that, my characters talked mostly inside their heads. It was a true light bulb moment.

WISRWAWhat is one piece of writing or industry advice you can offer to unpublished authors?

BARBARA: Trust your instincts.

WISRWAAny new books coming out in the near future?

BARBARA: The fifth and final book in my St. John Siblings series will be out later in 2018.

Fab 5 Contest Badge

 

 

For a chance to win a detailed critique by Barbara, don’t forget to enter the Fabulous Five contest. She will be offering a detailed a detailed critique for one lucky entrant from all the entries. For more information about the contest and to enter, click here.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

Fabulous Five Contest Author Critique: Cheryl Yeko

The 27th Annual Fabulous Five contest for unpublished authors and authors not published in book length fiction in the last five years is open for entries. WisRWA is pleased to be able to offer entrants of the 2018 Fabulous Five contest a chance to win one of eight detailed critiques from a published WisRWA author. We wanted to introduce everyone to each of these authors, and share a little bit about their writing journey. Without further ado, please meet our seventh author: Cheryl Yeko.

Headshot of Cheryl YekoCheryl is a multi-published, award-winning author and Acquiring Editor with Soul Mate Publishing. She also co-writes with fellow Soul Mate Editor, Char Chaffin, under the pen-name CiCi Cordelia.

 

She received her Administrative Assistant Degree from Milwaukee Area Technical College, in Wisconsin, as well as a Paralegal Certification through the American Institute for Paralegal Studies. She has over twenty-five years as a Legal Assistant, involving the drafting of legal correspondence and court documents. She belongs to several writing groups, including Romance Writers of America, Wisconsin Writers Association, and Wisconsin Screenwriters Forum.

 

Cheryl lives in Wisconsin with her husband Patrick, and loves to read, play piano, and spend time with family and friends. She enjoys novels with fast-paced action and steamy romance, protective alpha men and strong heroines.

WISRWAHow long have you been writing? Can you tell us a little about your journey to publication?

CHERYL: I wrote my debut novel in 2011. My wonderful husband bought me a Kindle for Christmas one year, and I rediscovered my love of romance novels and decided to write one myself. I took some online classes, checked out some books from the library, and disappeared into my room over a long Wisconsin winter to write Protecting Rose. I submitted my baby to a few publishing houses and received two contract offers.

I signed with Soul Mate Publishing in 2011 and couldn’t be happier. Protecting Rose went on to win the 2012 Gayle Wilson Award of Excellence in the Romantic Suspense category.

Book Cover for Loving a Hero by Cheryl YekoWISRWAWhat is something that you learned along the way that proved to be a light bulb moment and still is relevant to your writing today?

CHERYL: Trust your instincts. As a new author I felt like I had to ‘push the envelope’ to rise above the rest. Big mistake. There are some passages in my earlier novels I wish I’d never written. You need to be comfortable with what you write.

WISRWAWhat is one piece of writing or industry advice you can offer to unpublished authors?

CHERYL: Make sure you have a polished manuscript before submitting to an editor. Even if you have a good story, if the grammar, punctuation, and writing structure is a mess it’ll more than likely be rejected because of the time commitment to correct everything.

WISRWAAny new books coming out in the near future?

CHERYL: Why yes, thank you for asking. 😊 I have two novels up on Amazon for pre-order right now. Loving A Hero is the 3rd book in my Hero Series. I also have The Substitute Wife by CiCi Cordelia up as well. It’s the first book in a 3-book (or more?) Historical Western Series. Char and I are very excited about it. The Substitute Wife took 1st place in the URWA 2017 Great Beginnings Contest in their Historical Category. The Dance Hall Wife, Book two, is near completion and scheduled for an October release. And book three, The Innocent Wife, is scheduled for early 2019.

Fab 5 Contest Badge

 

 

For a chance to win a detailed critique by Lois, don’t forget to enter the Fabulous Five contest. She will be offering a detailed a detailed critique for one lucky entrant in the Romantic Suspense category. For more information about the contest and to enter, click here.

 

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

Fabulous Five Contest Author Critique: Casey Clifford

The 27th Annual Fabulous Five contest for unpublished authors and authors not published in book length fiction in the last five years is open for entries. WisRWA is pleased to be able to offer entrants of the 2018 Fabulous Five contest a chance to win one of eight detailed critiques from a published WisRWA author. We wanted to introduce everyone to each of these authors, and share a little bit about their writing journey. Without further ado, please meet our sixth author: Casey Clifford.

Headshot of Mary Jo ScheiblI’ll admit it. I’m one of those writers “who’s been writing forever.” Would you believe me if I say maybe I started about age 5? Well, I did, and received encouragement from my parents and grandparents. By age 10 or so, I was writing “plays” for the neighborhood kids to enact so their parents could brag. Gosh, I expect some of those families still have fuzzy home movies of those events.

Since I proudly acknowledge I’m published in fiction, I admit it took me 50 some years to attain that status.  What took so long? Well, life and the need to make a living.

Once I retired from teaching, I put serious effort into marketing what I had written and revised over summers between semesters, along with writing new material. After listening to my husband saying, “you have to spend money to make money,” I achieved “almost instant” success by accepting a contract–6 years after retirement. During those 6 years, I was “almost there” many times. Then something totally out of my control made the contract possibility dissolve faster than ice in August. Sound familiar?

As my hubby would often tell me in those years, one way to be a sure-fire failure was to quit writing.  I didn’t give up. I kept writing my stories always looking to improve my craft and skills with each finished manuscript.  Along the way, I’ve learned a few things I know helped me finally land that contract–hold my published book, Black Ribbon Affair, in my hand, and wept with joy when that book won several awards, especially the HOLT MEDALLION for best first book of the year.

Since that first book, I published a second romantic suspense with my publisher Wild Rose Press.

After those two books, I realized what I wrote was what I termed Wise Women Fiction, and my books didn’t fit well with Wild Rose’s guidelines. Independent publishing was emerging about that time, and I decided to take that plunge. I couldn’t have done so had I not learned about the orderly steps and work required to publish a good book. I thank my Wild Rose editor for that. I have published 9 books independently. They have won awards or been finalists in contests.

This biography leads to one of the items I’ve been asked to address for this blog:

  • What proved to be a lightbulb moment and is still relevant for me as a writer.

My answer?

  • Writing a great story is only a part of what makes a book successful. Once that tough job is done, you can’t skimp on the following points. Every book, published or not, requires them–so fight to achieve them.
  1. Set a schedule for writing that works with your daily life—and commit to it.
  2. Edit, edit, edit—after your last revision for content.
  3. Choose a title that grabs a reader but still reflects the storyline.

Since this is a blog aimed primarily for unpublished writers, I’ll expand a bit on each of the above items.

  1. I mentioned I wrote in the summer when I wasn’t teaching. That was my commitment to sitting in the chair, fingers at the keyboard or holding a pen. Except for the 2 weeks of vacation/family time, I wrote 3 hours a day for no less than 3-4 days of each week–no matter the heat or the urge to read a book all day. My primary goal at that time wasn’t publication so much, but researching, organizing a timeline, developing character sketches, and then writing the best book I could—to learn from it. Sometimes I edited, and sometimes I just wrote the rough draft straight-through. It depended on the story and how the writing was going. BUT I WROTE. And still had a demanding daily life.
  2. Editing/revision is the process of polishing the rough draft. If you are entering a contest, revise and edit your submission to make it the best it can be. Consider not only the grammar and spelling, punctuation, and sentence fluency, but also the writing elements of setting, character development, description, plot movement, what the submitted pages have to do to meet the requirement of good writing and story-telling. Only in that manner will you make your entry shine for its judges–or an editor should you decide to submit it to one.
  3. Ask someone who doesn’t know your story and reads a lot to read your pages. Listen to any concerns or comments they have about your work. This is especially helpful in catching/correcting plot problems, or awkward sentences, or even a detail that contradicts earlier ones.
  4. Finally, when a contest entry/submission is returned, and you do or don’t like the score, read the comments. And maybe, read them again, for they may contain just the pieces of wisdom that will help you strengthen your writing, your story, your personal growth as a writer. Maybe it will take you a week or more to gather the courage. But these comments are learning tools. This can be difficult sometimes, especially if a judge/editor doesn’t get your story. Or maybe is just a really mean judge.

 

Book Cover for Better than Dessert by Casey Clifford

But even from those situations, a writer can learn a valuable lesson. In the former, perhaps the opening, title, or category entered led the judge to expect something other than what you wrote. How can you be sure that doesn’t happen again? In the latter example, consider the mean criticism as a step to strengthen your tough, professional armor. Every writer, published or not, will encounter negative criticism. Learn from it. Ignore it.

Don’t let it keep you from writing—or learning.

Which leads me to the final element we are asked to address: What is one piece of writing or industry advice I can offer you. So here it is: Trust your instincts. Listen to your gut about your writing.

  • This is especially true for “newbie” writers who read every article, listen intently at every workshop, read the latest expert’s book promoting a “sure-fire” writing technique that works for everyone. Well, do these techniques work for you? Maybe yes. Maybe not at this time or for this project. Maybe never. And that’s okay.
  • So, you’re working on a project and things aren’t going well. You want to go one way with the character, but the character has a different idea. Been there? What do you do… Listen to your characters, especially if you see the sense of what they’re telling you. Strong characters will talk with you. Sometimes they even shout at you—so LISTEN!
  • Finally, if you hate what you’re writing, sometimes it’s best to walk away—until a later time. Often, the project needs more thought or research. Perhaps you need a simpler story to tighten your writing skills. If the project is good, take an hour away, a week, or maybe a year—to mull over the problem. Or perhaps write another less complex project that gives you more experience and insight as a writer. However, listen to your gut–keep writing something.

Fab 5 Contest BadgeI hope you, 2018’s Fab 5 entrants, find bits of wisdom in the above comments. I’ve learned them from other writers and from life. I write because the stories in my heart and the ideas in my head must land on a printed page. I urge you to understand WHY you write. This knowledge will push you always to do your best.

For a chance to win a detailed critique by Casey, don’t forget to enter the Fabulous Five contest. She will be offering a detailed a detailed critique for one lucky entrant in the Women’s Fiction category. For more information about the contest and to enter, click here.

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

Fabulous Five Contest Author Critique: Lois Greiman

The 27th Annual Fabulous Five contest for unpublished authors and authors not published in book length fiction in the last five years is open for entries. WisRWA is pleased to be able to offer entrants of the 2018 Fabulous Five contest a chance to win one of eight detailed critiques from a published WisRWA author. We wanted to introduce everyone to each of these authors, and share a little bit about their writing journey. Without further ado, please meet our fifth author: Lois Greiman.

Headshot of Lois GreimanUSA Today bestselling author, Lois Greiman, was born on a cattle ranch in central North Dakota where she learned to ride and spit with the best of them. After graduating from high school, she moved to Minnesota to train and show Arabian horses.

She sold her first novel, a historical romance, in 1992 and has published more than fifty titles since then, including romantic comedy, children’s stories, and her fun-loving Christina McMullen mysteries. A two-time Rita finalist, she has won such prestigious honors as Romantic Times Storyteller Of The Year, MFW’s Rising Star, RT’s Love and Laughter, the Toby Bromberg for most humorous mystery, and the LaVyrle Spencer Award. Her heroes have received K.I.S.S. recognition numerous times and her books have been seen regularly among the industry’s Top Picks!

With more than two million books printed worldwide, Lois currently lives on a small farm in Wisconsin with her family, some of whom are human.

WISRWAHow long have you been writing? Can you tell us a little about your journey to publication?

LOIS: I started writing as a kid…like most of us. But I became serious about becoming published way back in the 80’s. Long before digital publishing was even a techy’s wild dream. Because traditional publishing was the only game in town, I wooed the major houses for several years before Avon Books bought my first historical romance. Since then I’ve sold about 30 others to Avon (Harper Collins), several books to Harlequin, and a few to Berkley and Kensington before beginning writing my Chrissy McMullen mystery novels for Random House. I continue to write funny mysteries about Chrissy, the crazy psychologist, but I am currently self publishing Book Cover for Unhinged by Lois Greimanthem.

WISRWAWhat is something that you learned along the way that proved to be a light bulb moment and still is relevant to your writing today?

LOIS: Writing, I learned early on, is not for the faint of heart. It’s not an easy way to make a living. Most of us don’t make barrels of money, and the life style can be rather isolated. So if you don’t truly love it, it’s probably not worth the effort it takes to become published. But if you really enjoy the journey, there’s nothing quite like sitting around in your pajamas all day and creating a universe around characters who become as real to you as your aunt Martha.

WISRWAWhat is one piece of writing or industry advice you can offer to unpublished authors?

LOIS: Don’t let yourself get discouraged. No matter how it seems, this business is difficult for everyone…or almost everyone. Write what you love. Hang in there. And believe in yourself.

WISRWAAny new books coming out in the near future?

LOIS: My next Chrissy novel, as of yet untitled, will be released in June.

Fab 5 Contest Badge

 

 

For a chance to win a detailed critique by Lois, don’t forget to enter the Fabulous Five contest. She will be offering a detailed a detailed critique for one lucky entrant in the Inspirational category. For more information about the contest and to enter, click here.

 

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,

Fabulous Five Contest Author Critique: Tessa McFionn

The 27th Annual Fabulous Five contest for unpublished authors and authors not published in book length fiction in the last five years is open for entries. WisRWA is pleased to be able to offer entrants of the 2018 Fabulous Five contest a chance to win one of eight detailed critiques from a published WisRWA author. We wanted to introduce everyone to each of these authors, and share a little bit about their writing journey. Without further ado, please meet our fourth author: Tessa McFionn.

Tessa McFionn Author HeadshotTessa is a very native Californian and has called Southern California home for most of her life, growing up in San Diego and attending college in Northern California and Orange County, only to return to San Diego to work as a teacher. Insatiably curious and imaginative, she loves to learn and discover, making her wicked knowledge of trivial facts an unwelcomed guest at many Trivial Pursuit boards.

When not writing, she can be found at the movies or at Disneyland with her husband, as well as family, friends or anyone who wants to play at the Happiest Place on Earth. She also finds her artistic soul fed through her passions for theatre, dance and music. A proud parent of far too many high school seniors and two still living house plants, she also enjoys hockey, reading and playing Words with Friends to keep her vocabulary sharp. She is currently the President Elect of the San Diego chapter of Romance Writers of America and loves spending time working with such amazingly intelligent and creative writers.

WISRWAHow long have you been writing? Can you tell us a little about your journey to publication?

TESSA: Wow. I think like most authors, I first started writing when I was in elementary school. I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t tinkering with some story throughout the whole of my life. But, with regards to serious writing, I began my first novel, Spirit Fall, about eight years ago. I was standing on a ledge, looking over a very high bridge, and the world of my heroes was born in that moment. I worked on Spirit Fall for about two years, then on a virtual shelf, it sat. It sat for another Book Cover for Spirit Fall by Tessa McFionntwo years before I had the courage to send it out. Since then, I have three books in the Guardian Warriors series, with a fourth in the hands of my editor.

WISRWAWhat is something that you learned along the way that proved to be a light bulb moment and still is relevant to your writing today?

TESSA: Aside from no work is ever truly done? Actually, the best lightbulb moment happened at one of our RWA chapter meetings. The speaker was Angela James and she was giving a talk on what to do before hitting submit. Her advice was to read, or listen, to your manuscript. Brilliant! I have now listened to the mechanical computerized voice read passionate scenes for all my projects and boy, does it make a huge difference in edits.

WISRWAWhat is one piece of writing or industry advice you can offer to unpublished authors?

TESSA: Never give up. If you have stories to be told, tell them. And don’t count the number of rejections. It only takes one “yes” to change your entire life.

WISRWAAny new books coming out in the near future?

TESSA: I do. I’m fortunate to have found a wonderful new publisher who will be bringing my science fiction world to life in March. Book one, entitled To Discover a Divine, hits the shelves on March 20. This has been a true labor of love, and along with sci-fi, they will also be publishing a couple of short stories before the end of 2018. Also, the fourth book in my Guardians series is slated to be released sometime in the summer.

Fab 5 Contest Badge

 

 

For a chance to win a detailed critique by Tessa, don’t forget to enter the Fabulous Five contest. She will be offering a detailed a detailed critique for one lucky entrant in the Young Adult/New Adult category. For more information about the contest and to enter, click here.

 

 

Speak up:

comment

| TAGS:

, , , ,