WisRWA Calendar

Jun 20
2019
VIRTUAL MEETING: Cops & Robbers - How to Write Accurate Law Enforcement in Fiction
RSVP Required! Please visit the calendar tab for more information and to RSVP.

Retired Lieutenant Matthew Dietzler served as a police officer in both the New Berlin and Grand Chute, Wisconsin departments. With 20 years in law enforcement, he can spot both accurate and unrealistic portrayals of policing in fiction.

After the presentation by Retired Lieutenant Deitzler, there will be time for individual questions.

Meeting Times

Jun05
2019
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 Restaurant, 1951 Bond Street, Green Bay, WI

Promotion

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Jun08
2019
Chippewa Falls
10-12:30 at Deb's Cafe, 1120 122nd St, Chippewa Falls, WI

Tools for Series Writing

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Jun15
2019
Milwaukee
10 – 12:30 at Red Oak Writing Studio 11709 W Cleveland Ave. West Allis

Diversity, Equality, Inclusivity

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Jul10
2019
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 Restaurant, 1951 Bond Street, Green Bay, WI

The Publishing Process

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Jul13
2019
Chippewa Falls
10-12:30 at Deb's Cafe, 1120 122nd St, Chippewa Falls, WI

Topic TBD

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WisRWA Newsletter



General

WisRWA Write Touch Conference 2019: My Review

Let me start out by stating the thought of going to a three-day conference, by myself, without really knowing anyone else scared me silly. I’m relatively new to WISRWA, having moved from the metro Detroit area four years ago. But…I’m so happy I stepped outside my comfort zone and decided to make the investment in my career and go!

For me as an author, this year has been spent focusing on developing my craft and marketing. I found the sessions at the Write Touch Conference gave me a huge boost toward my goals.

On Friday (the first official day of conference), after arriving at the beautiful Hyatt Hotel in Downtown Milwaukee, I stepped into my first session with Agent Courtney Miller-Callihan. She provided insight into the romance market from an agent perspective. My big take-away from her session—Walmart is a big influence in the romance market, as they are the largest retail purchaser of romance. My next session was with Kimberly Brower, another literary agent, who presented information on what makes a good ‘hook’.

After a quick walk to the Public Market to buy lunch, I attended Mel Jolly’s newsletter session. My author newsletter was pretty much non-existent until Mel’s session. I’ve already put into use a lot of the information and tips I learned.

The day ended with an interesting Q & A with a panel of guest agents, authors, and editors. Dinner was held in the Vue, providing a beautiful view of the skyline of downtown.

Saturday morning was spent learning about emotional wounds from Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi. Yes, we all feel bad emotionally wounding our beloved characters but those wounds make for interesting and layered stories. I own their book, The Emotional Thesaurus. Attending a session with them in person was so educational. I really learned a lot from their presentation.

After lunch, I had the opportunity to pitch to an agent and editor. Both requested more material. I’m still waiting on replies but whatever the outcome, I felt the opportunity to meet one-on-one with them was a great experience.

Once my heart rate slowed back to a normal rate after my pitch appointments, I sat in on Lisa Cron’s Anatomy of a Scene. I purchased her book, Story Genius, and am currently in the middle of using it to create a deep profile for the main character of my next book. I highly recommend Story Genius if you don’t already have it in your writing tool box.

I attended another wonderful dinner in the company for some great authors, along with representatives from Literary Services, and enjoyed the keynote speech given by Maya Rodale. After dinner and enjoyable conversation, I did what most other introverts/bookworms would do and returned to my hotel room, looked over the cute gift basket I won at the auction, opened a bottle of wine, and read for a few hours before going to bed.

On Sunday, I ate a quick breakfast, packed my suitcase, and headed home, my spirit renewed. For the following week, I felt the lingering buzz of excitement from spending time studying my craft and meeting fellow romance authors.

I can honestly say the experience was such a great value. The cost wasn’t cheap, and I really debated if spending the money was a wise investment.

My conclusion—yes, yes it absolutely was! I made great new friends and learned from some of the best in our industry. Thank you to all the people who worked hard to make The Write Touch Conference such an amazing experience!

Laurie Winter

by: Laurie Winter

Laurie Winter is the award winning author of The Warriors of the Heart series, set in Wisconsin and Texas. Inspired by her dreams, she creates authentic characters who overcome the odds and find true love.
When not lost in the imaginary world of her stories, she enjoys time with her family, who are scattered between Wisconsin and Michigan. 

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New Release Tuesday May 2019

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

New Release Tuesday - March 2019

The Innocent Wife by Cici Cordelia

Saved Between the Sheets (Mutiny’s Rebellion) by Lina Jubilee

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How Attending the WisRWA Write Touch Conference was like Writing a Romance Novel

Everywhere I looked, a potential story scene loomed. Who was she meeting in that corner room? Why is she rocking out in front of everyone with her happy dance? That’s what attending the Write Touch Conference did to me. It inspired me to be creative and share my tales through the power of the written word. To paraphrase conference speaker and author Lisa Cron, we are wired to share stories.

I attended the Write Touch Conference to become a better writer. Like a sponge, I soaked in as much information as I could. I learned about story beats and crafting a scene. Marketing tips flowed freely from the speakers. Personal stories from beginning and accomplished authors on their path to publication uplifted me.

Being a novice, I’m still learning the basic elements of writing a novel. So, I’m plunging headfirst into romance novel plot points, using the #writetouchconference as my guide. With the plot structure adapted from Priscilla Oliveras‘s Gale Online Course, I’ve developed a story outline that incorporates some of the conference highlights.

The Characters

Conrad Hastings. He graduated from college a few decades ago, never took a creative writing course, and fell asleep numerous times reading Wuthering Heights. An unlikely romance novel writer.

Ms. Write Touch Conference. Teacher extraordinaire, romance professor, and connoisseur of fine wines. Heroine of all heroines. Motto: Dare to be Decadent.

Tara Fischer. Nicer than the girl next door, she wouldn’t hurt anyone’s feelings. The logical love interest for Conrad, she won’t get in the way between a writer and his muse.

The Hook

Reaching his mid-life crisis at full throttle, Conrad must write an entertaining novel to impress Tara or risk losing her to the sexy Scottish Highlander literary heroes (once she’s gone kilt, she’ll never come back).

Romance Plot Outline

Opening/Inciting Incident

“It’s not you, it’s me.”

Conrad has heard that phrase before, but it especially stung when it came from his friend Tara. A voracious reader, she could not look into his eyes. He’s asked her for an honest review of his novel, but he sensed her hesitation to tell the plain truth. He knew. He’s known all along. His writing sucked and he needed help.

Tara slid her smart phone across the restaurant table, opened to the WisRWA conference web page. No words were needed. He realized he has to attend.

The Meeting

Conrad cautiously stepped through the Hyatt vestibule, his senses overwhelmed with the busy lobby. But there she was – she could not be missed. Plastered on placards and a large wall, Ms. Write Touch Conference welcomed all writers.

Conrad nearly jumped out of his shoes from the slight tap on his shoulder. He turned around to gawk at the most beautiful woman he has ever seen.

“Welcome,” Ms. Write declared with a large grin, “I’m so happy you could attend.”

More enduring than advertised, she promised to guide him throughout the day. She suggested attending both writing and publishing/marketing events. Conrad was already smitten before the conference sessions even began.

Development (Intimacy Grows)

Day One lived up to the hype. Literary agents Courtney Miller-Callihan, Kimberly Brower, and Laura Zats talked about the current state of publishing and offered insights into new trends and possibilities. Editors Jennie Conway and Madeleine Colavita and Author Becca Puglisi offered constructive criticism to authors wanting a fresh and resplendent start to their novels.  Authors Angela Ackerman, Mel Jolly, and Angie Stanton provided ideas to find his audience and connect with them. The indelible and genuine Lisa Cron taught an all-day, intensive writing course on crafting the irresistible novel. Conrad felt his confidence grow, knowing even published writers had obstacles to conquer on their journey to success.

Conflict

Yet, he did not have Ms. Write’s full attention. She guided other aspiring and veteran writers through the smorgasbord of conference offerings. Night One’s special: An Evening with Daring and Decadent Girls. He wished he could be there to share in the fun, but family commitments came first. Will missing the evening adventure derail his novel?

Happy Times

Day Two was just as dazzling as the first day. Authors Angela Ackerman, Becca Puglisi, Valerie Biel, Mel Jolly, Amy Reichert, Lisa Cron, Angie Stanton, and Bobbi Dumas discussed novel writing, editing, publishing, and marketing. Keynote Speaker Maya Rodale spoke about writing the right story. He was given the tools to be successful. It was up to him to apply them, but fortunately inspiration was as close as the titillating glass elevator. He now had the perfect setting for writing a sex scene.

Conflict Crescendos

Guilt washed over Conrad’s face, stuck on the outside, looking in. There Ms. Write was again, center stage in the best restaurant with the best view, basking in glory as the sun set upon downtown Milwaukee. He had to go home early, while she regaled the writers with Daring Dialogue and Decadent Prose. Does she even miss him?

Misery or Big Black Moment

Why did he even want to write a novel? A great friend, Tara will always like him, even if his head-hopping scenes and verb conjugation made her dizzy. Ms. Write was there to provide the tools for a successful career and to provide guidance, support, and encouragement for his writing journey. He’s got the support, but he searched for motivation.

It’s simple – he wanted to share his stories and donate any proceeds to his favorite charities.

Resolution

At breakfast, in-between sharing bites of bacon with his dog, he realized he does not have to be jealous of Ms. Write. She favored no one, but supported everyone. She wanted all authors to succeed.

He made a promise. In two years’ time, he will reconnect with Ms. Write Touch Conference. She will be impressed. So will Tara.

By T. Ganfield

Tom Ganfield is working on his first novel, Chasing Chestnut, with younger versions of Conrad and Tara. As a dog lover, he is trying to position Chestnut (the dog) to steal scenes and the hearts of his characters (and maybe the readers?).

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Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution?

Imagine this scenario. A young woman has been asked out, repeatedly, by the same young man. Whenever she bumps into him in their small town, he asks her out again. She keeps saying no. He’s pressed her for a reason, and she’s told him that she just isn’t interested in dating him. She doesn’t want to hurt his feelings, but she isn’t attracted to him and his continued advances make her uncomfortable. He keeps bothering her, again and again. One night, she is crossing a bridge on her way home and meets the guy again. Is it really a coincidence? Has he been following her? He asks her out again; again she says no. So he climbs over the railing of the bridge and leans over the edge. The water beneath him is shallow and rocky. He tells the girl that if she doesn’t agree to go out with him, he’ll let go. He even releases one hand to show her how serious he is. Scared and with no other choice (other than to let him fall off the edge), she says yes.

Stories like this are becoming disturbingly common, especially among young people. On social media, we see stories of “crazy” guys pressuring girls into agreeing to go out with them, sometimes with wild ultimatums. Say yes, and he’ll stop harassing and threatening you. Say yes, or he’ll bring a gun to school. Say yes, or he’ll kill himself. We all know that there is nothing romantic about forced consent. Consider the story above. It’s not romantic. It’s creepy. This isn’t what love looks like.

Or is it?

The Notebook is arguably one of the most popular romance movies of our time. Reconsider that opening scene, and keep The Notebook in mind. This is oddly similar to the hero of The Notebook, who refused to take no for an answer and even went so far as to hang off a Ferris wheel to convince the heroine to date him. Of course, it was all okay because he was the hero and we knew he had good intentions. He wasn’t a creeper and they were soul mates.  We find this story sweet and endearing… or is that what we’ve been taught to think?

We’ve all heard that young boys pick on girls because they like them, teaching us that if a boy is mean to you, it’s because he likes you, not because he’s a jerk. (He’s Just Not That Into You, anyone?) In romance novels, we love a persistent hero who won’t give up. Young girls are taught that guys should chase them and that girls should play hard to get. If he doesn’t give up, he must really love you, and then you fall in love and live happily ever after. But in writing stories like these, are we part of the problem? Are we teaching young ladies that it’s okay for their “hero” to treat them badly because once they fall in love, everything will be okay? Are we teaching young men to do whatever it takes to get a girl to say yes, even if she doesn’t want to? Are we teaching young people that “no” doesn’t really mean no—it means “keep pushing until I give in?”

I don’t have the answers to these questions, but as we sit down to pen our next romance, hopefully these are things we’ll all take into consideration. Are you writing a story where your hero acts like a jerk, but it’s excused because he’s the hero of the story? Are you writing a story where the heroine is helpless and trapped, pressured by the guy who says he loves her? Or are you writing a story that models a good relationship for young people?

Food for thought.

Kayla Bain-Vrba

by: Kayla Bain-Vrba

Kayla has been living in daydreams ever since she was a little girl and writing about them for as long as she can remember. It was her discovery of m/m romance that jump-started her adventure as a published author in 2010. When she’s not writing—or is procrastinating writing—Kayla enjoys spending time with her other half, crafting, and planning things to a tee.

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Will writing in different genres kill your career?

I’d just finished reading a passage of my WIP to my writing group, and one member was like, “Wow, Dave, it’s amazing to see you write a book with no sex or swearing.”

And I was like, “Hell-o. My Fairy Dogmother.”

And then everyone in the group was like, “Oh, yeah.”

The experience illustrates a problem any writer who doesn’t stick strictly to one genre is likely to encounter. The previous four books I’d brought to my group were snarky novellas about a horny, potty-mouthed, screw-up witch. The WIP has all the snark, horniness and blue language of a Hallmark Christmas movie. But so did My Fairy Dogmother, which I wrote before The Incompetent Witch Series.

So what gives? Am I daring or just stupid? Is it wise to write spicy and sweet, Paranormal and Regency, Romantic Suspense and Romantic Fantasy?

Writing guru Kimberly Grabas says that exploring multiple genres “equals more work (and often) less income. It’s hard to build traction in one genre, let alone several. Switching or jumping genres leads to building multiple smaller audiences instead of steadily building a larger, more engaged fan base. Momentum is your friend, and sticking to one genre and writing books in a series (and releasing them back-to-back) is more lucrative, and builds a readership faster, than diversifying.”

New York Times Best-Selling Author Rebecca Zanetti kinda sorta disagrees, arguing that indie publishing has changed the game. “A few years ago, conventional wisdom dictated that an author should only write in one genre—at least until becoming well established. With the advent of ebooks, many authors have published across genres quite successfully. What’s fascinating is watching how readers committed to one genre will follow an author into another imaginary realm just because they enjoy that author’s work.”

The takeaway might be that writing in multiple genres could be either daring or dumb, but nobody knows until you do it.

My first series falls under the heading Contemporary Romance, the most popular genre when I wrote it. It’s set in Hollywood, so there’s plenty o’ carnality and cursing. The second series, listed as Humorous Supernatural Romance, was originally published in the Kindle Worlds program as a spinoff of books penned by a very successful Amazon author. The audience for those already existed, so I had expectations to meet.

Meanwhile, My Fairy Dogmother and my WIP are targeted toward much different readers and their expectations, and I intend to use both to test the trad publishing waters.

The marketing gurus—including Gabras, Zanetti and multi-platinum author HM Ward—say is that it’s not bad to write in different genres, but suggest a few things to keep in mind if you do.

  • Know the genres you write in.
  • Remember that your voice makes your writing unique.
  • Write books that no other author could have written.
  • Venturing into new territory leads to personal and professional growth.

In addition, keeping up on marketing trends can help. “Branding,” Grabas says, “isn’t nearly as corporate or commercial as it’s believed to be. It’s your style, your unique voice, and the combination of recurrent themes, character types, settings, and ideas that make up the familiar elements characteristic to your writing.” It includes things like your website colors, logo design and tagline and social media presence and the tone of your newsletter.

Zanetti notes that having the right cover design and book descriptions go a long way in telling readers what your books and series are about, lest they become confused and buy a book they’re likely to despise. On the other hand, Ward says that many readers might be willing to explore a genre they never considered just because they like you!

And then, there’s this: Tastes change. Contemporary Romance fell out of favor for a while, so it probably wouldn’t have been a great idea for me to keep flogging that horse. The supernatural Kindle Worlds books sold pretty well until Amazon killed the Kindle Worlds program—and I had a lot of fun writing them.

So, even if I’m being stupid, I have no regrets. And, who knows, maybe someday the discussion will be about genre-hoppers and niche-specialists, much in the way “outlining” and “pantsing” are now both recognized as legitimate approaches to writing a first draft. It may just come down to who you are and/or what you’re writing at the moment.

by: Dave Thome

Dave lives in Shorewood, Wisconsin, where he and his wife Mary Jo run a writing business. An automotive news writer by day, he’s penned several screenplays, including a few that came this close to being made into movies, and has indie-published several novels under the name DC Thome, including the Fast Lane Romance Series. He’s currently republishing The Incompetent Witch Series, which originally appeared as Kindle Worlds books

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2019 Write Touch Finalists

Write Touch Readers Award Contest

Wisconsin Romance Writers of America is pleased to announce the finalists of the 2019 Write Touch Readers’ Award Contest!. Winners will be announced at the Write Touch Conference in Milwaukee, April 4-7. Congratulations to all our finalists, and a big thank you to all our participants, judges and volunteers!

**denotes WisRWA member

Contemporary – Short

  • Desperate Strangers by Carla Cassidy
  • The Hashtag Hunt by Kristina Seek
  • Three Day Fiancée by Marissa Clarke

Contemporary – Mid-Length (tie for third place)

  • A Cowboy’s Christmas Proposal by Cathy McDavid
  • Headlights, Dipsticks, & My Ex’s Brother by Heather Novak
  • Marrying the Rebel Prince by Janet Gover
  • Mischief & Mayhem by L. E. Rico

Contemporary – Long

  • Deep Blue by Kristy McCaffrey
  • To My Future Number 1 Fan by L. A. Witt
  • Within Six Months by Cleo Scornavacca

Erotic

  • Indecent Proposal by Sarah McGregor
  • Fading to Black by V. H. Luis
  • Waking to Black by V. H. Luis

Historical

  • A Wolfe Among Dragons by Kathryn Le Veque
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Duke by Janna MacGregor
  • The Missing Marquess of Althorn by Chasity Bowlin

Paranormal

  • Eight Simple Rules for Dating a Dragon by Kerrelyn Sparks
  • Hellfire and Handbaskets by Kathryn Hills
  • Winds of Time by Lilly Gayle

Inspirational

  • For the Love of Laura Beth by Aubrey Wynne
  • From Shards to Sea Glass by Michele Wilder
  • Primary Suspect by Laura Scott **

Romantic Suspense (tie for third place)

  • Buried Lies by Kaylea Cross
  • Her Darkest Fear by Ava Bradley
  • Love With a Side of Crazy by Tina Susedik **
  • Missing Out on Life by Val Clarizio **

Mainstream Fiction

  • Race for the Sun by Minette Lauren
  • Storm Crossed by Dani Harper
  • Town Hall by Gini Athey **

Young Adult (tie for third place)

  • Between Silk and Sand by Marissa Doyle
  • Friended by Kilby Blades
  • The Dating Debate by Chris Cannon
  • This Heart of Mine by C. C. Hunter

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Wisconsin Authors at #WisRWA19

WisRWA Write Touch Conference Logo

The Write Touch Conference is “Write” Around the Corner.

April 4th-7th, talented writers from all over the country will be heading into Milwaukee to hobnob at WisRWA’s Daring and Decadent Conference.

We’re excited to show off some of Wisconsin’s home-town writing talents!

Amy Reichert, Valerie Biel, Angie Stanton, and Bobbi Dumas will be presenting sessions at the conference and they are all proud to call Wisconsin their home.

Author Amy E. Reichert’s 1st book, The Coincidence of Coconut Cake is often used as a guide for Milwaukee visitors! Amy is a true fan of our terrific city so it was only natural for her to give it a starring role in her book.  Set in Milwaukee, her story highlights the Brewers, Milwaukee’s food scene with its array of terrific restaurants, the summer festivals, custard, the scenic lakefront and the amazing Calatrava. Before dinner Friday April 5th, Amy will be welcoming conference attendees to Milwaukee. On Saturday April 6th, Amy will work with writers on their editing skills.

Since “Coincidence” was published, Amy has penned three more books: Luck, Love & Lemon Pie, The Simplicity of Cider and The Optimist’s Guide to Letting Go. All are placed in or around our great state of Wisconsin.  Get to know Amy here: www.amyereichert.com

Once upon a time, Valerie Biel graduated from the University of Wisconsin with degrees in journalism and political science. Now she lives in rural Wisconsin with her husband and children, and writes…a lot. Her debut novel Circle of Nine – Beltany was honored as a 2015 Kindle Book Award Finalist and has won other awards.

#WisRWA19 is excited to have Val present a workshop on Saturday April 6th .

If you’re attending the conference and looking to self-publish your book baby, Val’s workshop, Indie Publishing Blueprint: 1st Steps to Publication, is perfect for you.

Learn more about Valerie Biel here: http://www.valeriebiel.com/

Angie Stanton lives in Madison. Her 1st career plan was to be a Rockette, but living in the Midwest, dancing didn’t quite work out. So she took her daydreams, perfected them into stories in her head and started to write them down. Even though she never made it on a stage to kick up her heels, she’s still, a huge fan of musicals. Her latest book, If Ever, takes readers on a dream ride from a reality dance show to a Broadway musical. Angie will be presenting two workshops at #WisRWA19. She’ll guide you through the publishing process when your book baby is first born and she’ll help you create another revenue stream for your book with an audio version. To find out more about Angie go here:    https://www.harpercollins.com/author/cr-107475/angie-stanton/

Bobbi Dumas lives in Madison, WI and we are excited to have her join us in Milwaukee at #WisRWA19. Bobbi is a freelance writer, book reviewer, and a huge romance advocate. Bobbi founded Read-A-Romance Month and writes about books and romance for NPR, The Huffington Post and Kirkus. On Saturday April 6th, Bobbi will be presenting an interactive workshop to help writers get to, “Know Thyself!” She’ll work with writers and guide them through the often twisty journey that comes along with being a writer. Bobbi loves to talk about books and writing and will share it all with attendees at #WisRWA19!  You can read Bobbi’s latest Kirkus review here:  https://www.kirkusreviews.com/features/author/bobbi-dumas/

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New Release Tuesday March 2019

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

Saving the Scot by Jennifer Trethewey

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The Write Touch Conference is “Write” Around the Corner!

This exciting conference weekend in Milwaukee is coming up so fast it’s making my head spin.

There will be so many opportunities to meet your writer squad, rejuvenate your writing spirit, learn your craft, relax and discuss your passion for writing and love of storytelling!

Storyteller, Lisa Cron is excited, too!

We are so happy to introduce everyone to Lisa Cron, author of Story Genius and Wired for Story.

Lisa Cron’s writing intensive kicks off on Friday morning April 5th at 9am. Originally, Lisa’s intensive was scheduled only for the morning, but she loves talking about writing and to writers. So Lisa is going to work with writers all day at this workshop.  All day!

We’ll kick off the intensive at 9 am and go until 4:30 pm on Friday April 5th. As we don’t want anyone to suffer from information overload, we’ve planned a coffee break in the middle of the morning and afternoon sessions and a lunch break from 12-1:30 pm.

If all day is just too much for you, relax. You can jump in and participate in the intensive in the morning or afternoon, whenever you’re most comfortable or most inspired!

There will be plenty of time to meet Lisa, talk about writing with her, work on your own writing and ultimately, you’ll become a better storyteller!

Here’s the description of Lisa Cron’s intensive so you’ll have a solid idea of what to expect when attending the workshop:

WHAT YOUR READER REALLY WANTS: 8 STEPS TO WRITING AN IRRESISTIBLE NOVEL (OR MEMOIR, SCREENPLAY OR SHORT STORY)

“Every writer wants two things: to tell a story that hooks readers and never lets them go, and to find a way to accomplish that without going through the long slog of endlessly writing draft after draft. This workshop will give you actionable ways to meet both goals. Instead of rooting around in your “plot” for the story, you’ll unearth the key elements specific to your story that will then create the plot, bring it to life, drive it forward, and give it meaning. These elements have little to do with the surface events or “writing well” and everything to do with what we’re hardwired to respond to in every story we read (turns out the brain is far less picky about lyrical language than we’ve been lead to believe).  You’ll be able to zero in on what your story is actually about before you write word one, or if you’re in the midst of your umpteenth rewrite, before you write another word. You’ll not only produce a more powerful novel, chances are you’ll drastically reduce your rewrite time.”

For more information about the conference, Lisa Cron’s intensive, and to register, click here.

by: Tricia Quinnies, Write Touch Conference Coordinator

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Combat Writer’s Block with an Idea Factory

If you’ve ever experienced the heaviness of writer’s block, you know you’ll never want to stare at a blank page, without an idea, ever again, period.

Let’s learn from the bad times and turn them into something good. Here are a few tips I use to build an idea factory, when writer’s block may hit again.

Collect ideas as they flow. You may be on vacation, at a restaurant, in bed at 2 a.m., and plot ideas, conversations, scenes, and characters are falling at your feet. Write them down right away! Grab a pad of paper, record thoughts on your voicemail, send yourself an email or text. Don’t let those great ideas slip away. You’re a writer, those ideas are interesting to you, they will be interesting to your readers.

For example, I was filling my soda cup at a fast food restaurant when a young girl stepped up next to me. The way she moved with grace and confidence reminded me of the main character of a story I was working on. I went back to my table and recorded my observations, her hair color, the way she moved, how she dressed.

Here’s another example. I was at an art museum and a strange exhibit captured my attention. The folk-art I studied that day became the background of a story. I hurried to the museum coffee shop to write down the essence of the exhibit. What attracted me to it. How I felt about it. How it looked. Then I searched websites for more information. I still have those notes and refer to them as I edit.

Eavesdrop. When you hear an interesting conversation, tune your ear to the cadence of the discussion. Everyone knows that one person who uses unique turns of phrase, or thinks differently than anyone else. Channel them the next time you are stuck in a rut and need to add new patterns to your dialog.

Seek your characters in magazines, newspapers, or the internet as you move through your day. Cut pictures of your characters out of department store ads when you find them. Download photos. Hang them on a wall where you write, along with their bios.  When you need inspiration, take a good long look at the pictures again.

Watch for situations that are stranger than fiction. What happened to your co-worker, neighbor, children? Does your friend have a litany of stories about her bad dates? Ask her if you can borrow some for your next book.

Immerse yourself in research. Search websites for more information about the setting of your story. If it’s set in a Victorian era home, tour one near you. Record your impressions.

Ask questions. When you find someone knowledgeable about the subject of your book, like that historic home, talk to them. When they go on a tangent, follow it by asking questions. They’ll likely bring up a tidbit of information no one knows about, but it would be perfect for your story. Maybe there was a secret tunnel that used to connect a barn to the home’s cellar. Is that the way your main character snuck into the home on that fateful night?

Now that you’ve got raw material to work with, peel back the onion. While your ideas are still fresh, ask yourself why the person in the ad captivates you? Is it his stormy eyes, his wavy hair? What part of the old house interested you most? The hand carved furniture? The exquisite fireplace mantel? The patterned wallpaper? What would it be like to crawl though the secret tunnel?

Take time to write down details as they appear in your life. Don’t let them go. Save them so that the next time you experience writer’s block, pat yourself on the back. You now have an idea factory ready to propel you forward.

by: Laura Dritlein

Laura Dritlein is a former freelance reporter for local newspapers and magazines. She is currently working on editing two novels with the goal of publishing them. She is constantly in search of new characters and story ideas.

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