WisRWA Calendar

Jun 20
2019
VIRTUAL MEETING: Cops & Robbers - How to Write Accurate Law Enforcement in Fiction
RSVP Required! Please visit the calendar tab for more information and to RSVP.

Retired Lieutenant Matthew Dietzler served as a police officer in both the New Berlin and Grand Chute, Wisconsin departments. With 20 years in law enforcement, he can spot both accurate and unrealistic portrayals of policing in fiction.

After the presentation by Retired Lieutenant Deitzler, there will be time for individual questions.

Meeting Times

Jun05
2019
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 Restaurant, 1951 Bond Street, Green Bay, WI

Promotion

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Jun08
2019
Chippewa Falls
10-12:30 at Deb's Cafe, 1120 122nd St, Chippewa Falls, WI

Tools for Series Writing

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Jun15
2019
Milwaukee
10 – 12:30 at Red Oak Writing Studio 11709 W Cleveland Ave. West Allis

Diversity, Equality, Inclusivity

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Jul10
2019
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 Restaurant, 1951 Bond Street, Green Bay, WI

The Publishing Process

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Jul13
2019
Chippewa Falls
10-12:30 at Deb's Cafe, 1120 122nd St, Chippewa Falls, WI

Topic TBD

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WisRWA Newsletter



April, 2019

The Things I Didn’t Do

Like most writers I know, I collect inspiring/encouraging quotes and keep them where I can see them in my office. Somehow, these quotes and thoughts are shortcut reminders of various attitudes and qualities we need as writers: determination, persistence, fired up creativity, the courage to dream big, making course corrections, and so on. You probably have a list of your own that matches what you need to make a life in the creative life possible.  

       Right now, I’m starting something new, a type of writing I haven’t done before. It’s all fresh ground to cover and explore. Because other books were ahead in line, I’ve let this old idea-project slide down on my list of priorities for years. No more! It’s time to put it in the top ten—maybe the top three. If I don’t get on with this book, which I believe in for all kinds of reasons, I am 100% sure I’ll regret it.  

So, now is the time for Mark Twain to pay me a visit and give me a boost with a gentle reminder:   

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore…Dream…Discover.

            Since I spent a lot of time sailing at one time in my life—decades ago now—the idea of “throwing off the bowlines” arouses something in me. A sense of adventure, a curiosity about what’s around the next corner, a feeling that something special is waiting for me to claim it. You know what I mean. But our friend Mark Twain was also right about regretting what we don’t do.  

            As for me, I wish I’d started writing fiction sooner. I was steeped in nonfiction, the source of my income, so it wasn’t like I was slacking off. But the longing was always there. Story ideas written in journals and spiral notebooks twenty-five years ago made it onto my to-do list and many are still waiting patiently today. Some one or two line notes eventually became Greta’s Grace or Girl in the Spotlight or any of my other books. One idea also became this new book I’m inching my way into. 

I don’t want my new idea to be one of those “wish I’d done” projects. Pushing ideas under the rug, ignoring snippets and flashes, and delaying the start of a project costs too much. Mentally, I mean. When I used to ghostwrite books, the clients knew (or thought they knew) the price of procrastination. They measured it in lost income and delayed professional prestige.

We novelists usually can’t calculate a financial cost. Maybe we’d be better off financially if we took up some other line of work. Wait, I was only kidding. I hear you hollering at me at the very suggestion. Not every project is weighed the same, of course. I’ve let a few ideas shrivel up and die and that’s okay. They hadn’t merited enough passion to keep them alive.

My new project is different. If I don’t write this book, I’ll regret it and the characters will hunt me down and haunt me forever. That’s the only guarantee I have. So, I’ve sailed away from the dock.

What about you? Do you have one or two or ten of those book ideas that call your name—even in your sleep? So do you hear Mark Twain urging you on?

I’m grateful for my WisRWA friends for many reasons. They understand the way ideas grab me and why I can’t or don’t start them immediately. But they gladly turn into cheerleaders when I say I’m finally plunging in. And I’m here doing the same for them. The gifts we give each other are truly priceless. Let’s all sail away into great new writing adventures and see how far we can go!

by: Virginia McCullough

A member of WisRWA since 2001, the same year she moved to Green Bay, Wisconsin, Virginia McCullough writes women’s fiction and romances for Harlequin’s Heartwarming line. A FAMILY FOR JASON, book one of her new series, Back to Bluestone River, is scheduled for an August 2019 release. Her award winning novels tell the stories of everyday people struggling with everyday life issues in settings that often include oceans, lakes, rivers—and boats. A past-president of WisRWA, Virginia has also enjoyed a long career as a ghostwriter and editor of nonfiction books and novels.

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Will writing in different genres kill your career?

I’d just finished reading a passage of my WIP to my writing group, and one member was like, “Wow, Dave, it’s amazing to see you write a book with no sex or swearing.”

And I was like, “Hell-o. My Fairy Dogmother.”

And then everyone in the group was like, “Oh, yeah.”

The experience illustrates a problem any writer who doesn’t stick strictly to one genre is likely to encounter. The previous four books I’d brought to my group were snarky novellas about a horny, potty-mouthed, screw-up witch. The WIP has all the snark, horniness and blue language of a Hallmark Christmas movie. But so did My Fairy Dogmother, which I wrote before The Incompetent Witch Series.

So what gives? Am I daring or just stupid? Is it wise to write spicy and sweet, Paranormal and Regency, Romantic Suspense and Romantic Fantasy?

Writing guru Kimberly Grabas says that exploring multiple genres “equals more work (and often) less income. It’s hard to build traction in one genre, let alone several. Switching or jumping genres leads to building multiple smaller audiences instead of steadily building a larger, more engaged fan base. Momentum is your friend, and sticking to one genre and writing books in a series (and releasing them back-to-back) is more lucrative, and builds a readership faster, than diversifying.”

New York Times Best-Selling Author Rebecca Zanetti kinda sorta disagrees, arguing that indie publishing has changed the game. “A few years ago, conventional wisdom dictated that an author should only write in one genre—at least until becoming well established. With the advent of ebooks, many authors have published across genres quite successfully. What’s fascinating is watching how readers committed to one genre will follow an author into another imaginary realm just because they enjoy that author’s work.”

The takeaway might be that writing in multiple genres could be either daring or dumb, but nobody knows until you do it.

My first series falls under the heading Contemporary Romance, the most popular genre when I wrote it. It’s set in Hollywood, so there’s plenty o’ carnality and cursing. The second series, listed as Humorous Supernatural Romance, was originally published in the Kindle Worlds program as a spinoff of books penned by a very successful Amazon author. The audience for those already existed, so I had expectations to meet.

Meanwhile, My Fairy Dogmother and my WIP are targeted toward much different readers and their expectations, and I intend to use both to test the trad publishing waters.

The marketing gurus—including Gabras, Zanetti and multi-platinum author HM Ward—say is that it’s not bad to write in different genres, but suggest a few things to keep in mind if you do.

  • Know the genres you write in.
  • Remember that your voice makes your writing unique.
  • Write books that no other author could have written.
  • Venturing into new territory leads to personal and professional growth.

In addition, keeping up on marketing trends can help. “Branding,” Grabas says, “isn’t nearly as corporate or commercial as it’s believed to be. It’s your style, your unique voice, and the combination of recurrent themes, character types, settings, and ideas that make up the familiar elements characteristic to your writing.” It includes things like your website colors, logo design and tagline and social media presence and the tone of your newsletter.

Zanetti notes that having the right cover design and book descriptions go a long way in telling readers what your books and series are about, lest they become confused and buy a book they’re likely to despise. On the other hand, Ward says that many readers might be willing to explore a genre they never considered just because they like you!

And then, there’s this: Tastes change. Contemporary Romance fell out of favor for a while, so it probably wouldn’t have been a great idea for me to keep flogging that horse. The supernatural Kindle Worlds books sold pretty well until Amazon killed the Kindle Worlds program—and I had a lot of fun writing them.

So, even if I’m being stupid, I have no regrets. And, who knows, maybe someday the discussion will be about genre-hoppers and niche-specialists, much in the way “outlining” and “pantsing” are now both recognized as legitimate approaches to writing a first draft. It may just come down to who you are and/or what you’re writing at the moment.

by: Dave Thome

Dave lives in Shorewood, Wisconsin, where he and his wife Mary Jo run a writing business. An automotive news writer by day, he’s penned several screenplays, including a few that came this close to being made into movies, and has indie-published several novels under the name DC Thome, including the Fast Lane Romance Series. He’s currently republishing The Incompetent Witch Series, which originally appeared as Kindle Worlds books

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2019 Write Touch Finalists

Write Touch Readers Award Contest

Wisconsin Romance Writers of America is pleased to announce the finalists of the 2019 Write Touch Readers’ Award Contest!. Winners will be announced at the Write Touch Conference in Milwaukee, April 4-7. Congratulations to all our finalists, and a big thank you to all our participants, judges and volunteers!

**denotes WisRWA member

Contemporary – Short

  • Desperate Strangers by Carla Cassidy
  • The Hashtag Hunt by Kristina Seek
  • Three Day Fiancée by Marissa Clarke

Contemporary – Mid-Length (tie for third place)

  • A Cowboy’s Christmas Proposal by Cathy McDavid
  • Headlights, Dipsticks, & My Ex’s Brother by Heather Novak
  • Marrying the Rebel Prince by Janet Gover
  • Mischief & Mayhem by L. E. Rico

Contemporary – Long

  • Deep Blue by Kristy McCaffrey
  • To My Future Number 1 Fan by L. A. Witt
  • Within Six Months by Cleo Scornavacca

Erotic

  • Indecent Proposal by Sarah McGregor
  • Fading to Black by V. H. Luis
  • Waking to Black by V. H. Luis

Historical

  • A Wolfe Among Dragons by Kathryn Le Veque
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Duke by Janna MacGregor
  • The Missing Marquess of Althorn by Chasity Bowlin

Paranormal

  • Eight Simple Rules for Dating a Dragon by Kerrelyn Sparks
  • Hellfire and Handbaskets by Kathryn Hills
  • Winds of Time by Lilly Gayle

Inspirational

  • For the Love of Laura Beth by Aubrey Wynne
  • From Shards to Sea Glass by Michele Wilder
  • Primary Suspect by Laura Scott **

Romantic Suspense (tie for third place)

  • Buried Lies by Kaylea Cross
  • Her Darkest Fear by Ava Bradley
  • Love With a Side of Crazy by Tina Susedik **
  • Missing Out on Life by Val Clarizio **

Mainstream Fiction

  • Race for the Sun by Minette Lauren
  • Storm Crossed by Dani Harper
  • Town Hall by Gini Athey **

Young Adult (tie for third place)

  • Between Silk and Sand by Marissa Doyle
  • Friended by Kilby Blades
  • The Dating Debate by Chris Cannon
  • This Heart of Mine by C. C. Hunter

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