February, 2019

New Release Tuesday – February 2019

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

My Racy Reverse Harem Book Club by Lina Jubilee

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The Write Touch Conference is “Write” Around the Corner!

This exciting conference weekend in Milwaukee is coming up so fast it’s making my head spin.

There will be so many opportunities to meet your writer squad, rejuvenate your writing spirit, learn your craft, relax and discuss your passion for writing and love of storytelling!

Storyteller, Lisa Cron is excited, too!

We are so happy to introduce everyone to Lisa Cron, author of Story Genius and Wired for Story.

Lisa Cron’s writing intensive kicks off on Friday morning April 5th at 9am. Originally, Lisa’s intensive was scheduled only for the morning, but she loves talking about writing and to writers. So Lisa is going to work with writers all day at this workshop.  All day!

We’ll kick off the intensive at 9 am and go until 4:30 pm on Friday April 5th. As we don’t want anyone to suffer from information overload, we’ve planned a coffee break in the middle of the morning and afternoon sessions and a lunch break from 12-1:30 pm.

If all day is just too much for you, relax. You can jump in and participate in the intensive in the morning or afternoon, whenever you’re most comfortable or most inspired!

There will be plenty of time to meet Lisa, talk about writing with her, work on your own writing and ultimately, you’ll become a better storyteller!

Here’s the description of Lisa Cron’s intensive so you’ll have a solid idea of what to expect when attending the workshop:

WHAT YOUR READER REALLY WANTS: 8 STEPS TO WRITING AN IRRESISTIBLE NOVEL (OR MEMOIR, SCREENPLAY OR SHORT STORY)

“Every writer wants two things: to tell a story that hooks readers and never lets them go, and to find a way to accomplish that without going through the long slog of endlessly writing draft after draft. This workshop will give you actionable ways to meet both goals. Instead of rooting around in your “plot” for the story, you’ll unearth the key elements specific to your story that will then create the plot, bring it to life, drive it forward, and give it meaning. These elements have little to do with the surface events or “writing well” and everything to do with what we’re hardwired to respond to in every story we read (turns out the brain is far less picky about lyrical language than we’ve been lead to believe).  You’ll be able to zero in on what your story is actually about before you write word one, or if you’re in the midst of your umpteenth rewrite, before you write another word. You’ll not only produce a more powerful novel, chances are you’ll drastically reduce your rewrite time.”

For more information about the conference, Lisa Cron’s intensive, and to register, click here.

by: Tricia Quinnies, Write Touch Conference Coordinator

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Combat Writer’s Block with an Idea Factory

If you’ve ever experienced the heaviness of writer’s block, you know you’ll never want to stare at a blank page, without an idea, ever again, period.

Let’s learn from the bad times and turn them into something good. Here are a few tips I use to build an idea factory, when writer’s block may hit again.

Collect ideas as they flow. You may be on vacation, at a restaurant, in bed at 2 a.m., and plot ideas, conversations, scenes, and characters are falling at your feet. Write them down right away! Grab a pad of paper, record thoughts on your voicemail, send yourself an email or text. Don’t let those great ideas slip away. You’re a writer, those ideas are interesting to you, they will be interesting to your readers.

For example, I was filling my soda cup at a fast food restaurant when a young girl stepped up next to me. The way she moved with grace and confidence reminded me of the main character of a story I was working on. I went back to my table and recorded my observations, her hair color, the way she moved, how she dressed.

Here’s another example. I was at an art museum and a strange exhibit captured my attention. The folk-art I studied that day became the background of a story. I hurried to the museum coffee shop to write down the essence of the exhibit. What attracted me to it. How I felt about it. How it looked. Then I searched websites for more information. I still have those notes and refer to them as I edit.

Eavesdrop. When you hear an interesting conversation, tune your ear to the cadence of the discussion. Everyone knows that one person who uses unique turns of phrase, or thinks differently than anyone else. Channel them the next time you are stuck in a rut and need to add new patterns to your dialog.

Seek your characters in magazines, newspapers, or the internet as you move through your day. Cut pictures of your characters out of department store ads when you find them. Download photos. Hang them on a wall where you write, along with their bios.  When you need inspiration, take a good long look at the pictures again.

Watch for situations that are stranger than fiction. What happened to your co-worker, neighbor, children? Does your friend have a litany of stories about her bad dates? Ask her if you can borrow some for your next book.

Immerse yourself in research. Search websites for more information about the setting of your story. If it’s set in a Victorian era home, tour one near you. Record your impressions.

Ask questions. When you find someone knowledgeable about the subject of your book, like that historic home, talk to them. When they go on a tangent, follow it by asking questions. They’ll likely bring up a tidbit of information no one knows about, but it would be perfect for your story. Maybe there was a secret tunnel that used to connect a barn to the home’s cellar. Is that the way your main character snuck into the home on that fateful night?

Now that you’ve got raw material to work with, peel back the onion. While your ideas are still fresh, ask yourself why the person in the ad captivates you? Is it his stormy eyes, his wavy hair? What part of the old house interested you most? The hand carved furniture? The exquisite fireplace mantel? The patterned wallpaper? What would it be like to crawl though the secret tunnel?

Take time to write down details as they appear in your life. Don’t let them go. Save them so that the next time you experience writer’s block, pat yourself on the back. You now have an idea factory ready to propel you forward.

by: Laura Dritlein

Laura Dritlein is a former freelance reporter for local newspapers and magazines. She is currently working on editing two novels with the goal of publishing them. She is constantly in search of new characters and story ideas.

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