WisRWA Calendar

Oct 06
2018
WisRWA 2018 Fall Workshop
Mark your calendars for the 2018 Fall Workshop on October 5-6, 2018 at the Grand Lodge Waterpark Resort, Rothschild, WI. For more information, click the Workshop tab.
Apr 05
2019
WisRWA 2019 Write Touch Conference
Mark your calendars for the 2019 Write Touch Conference April 5-7, 2019 at the Milwaukee Hyatt in beautiful downtown Milwaukee. The conference will feature Maya Rodale as keynote speaker, and Lisa Cron as one of the headliners. More details to follow!

Meeting Times

May 02
2018
Green Bay
11:30-3 at 1951 West 1951 Bond Street, Green Bay

Deep Point of View

As authors, we hear it all the time - but what does it really mean, and how can we incorporate it into our novels? Join us as we find out!
May 12
2018
Chippewa Falls
10-12:30 at Deb's Café 1120 122nd Street, Chippewa Falls

Conference Preparation

Conferences are a great opportunity to meet other writers, learn about craft, and of course, meet and pitch to editors and agents. Come and learn how to get the most out of your conference experience!
May 12
2018
Wausau
10-12:00 at Marathon County Library 300 North First Street, Wausau

Using Canva to Help Market Your Books and your Brand

Want to learn how to design memes? Lyn Cote and Amy Sandas will teach us the ins and outs of Canva, a program that enables anyone to become a designer!
May 19
2018
Milwaukee
9am-11:30 at the Mayfair Mall (Garden Suites Community Room, lower level), Wauwatosa

Stress Relief for Writers

Join our authors as we hunker down to write, share ideas, and brainstorm to solve any roadblocks we've met. WisRWA member Vicky Hinshaw will focus on Stress Relief for Authors.

WisRWA Newsletter



April, 2018

New Release Tuesday – April 2018

NewReleaseTuesday2

Congratulations to the following WisRWA members on their new releases this month.

 

Book Cover of Phaze by S.C. Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phaze by S.C. Mitchell

 

Book Cover of Loving a Hero by Cheryl Yeko

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loving  a Hero by Cheryl Yeko

 

Book Cover of After All by Laurie Winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After All by Laurie Winter

 

 

 

 

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Building Sandcastles

“’I’m writing a first draft and reminding myself that I’m simply shoveling sand into a box so that later I can build castles.” -Shannon Hale

When I saw this quote late last year, I didn’t realize just how much it would affect my writing from that day forward. It has, however, now become the mantra I chant when I barrel through 5,000-10,000 words a day. That simple sentence changed the way I write… and I’d like to think it’s for the better.

The first novel I wrote took a few years of on and off dabbling. When inspiration struck I wrote a paragraph here, a sentence there, until finally I typed those two magical words. The end. The feeling I had when I finished was a sense of accomplishment unlike any I’d experienced before. I wanted to go back and do it again… to feel the rush of knowing I’d done it. I’d written a novel.

So I started a new one. Again, a paragraph here, a sentence there but always waiting… waiting for inspiration to guide my hand and craft the words into something beautiful. Hours could be spent staring at that damn flashing cursor waiting for that poetic sentence to come together. It was then I saw the quote.

That night I started typing. Fast. I had the story in my head and the characters were off running. Rather than trying to find the perfect words to describe their every move and feeling, I just started pouring words onto the page like a court reporter transcribing everything I saw. I was amazed at how fast the story was unfolding, and how many more layers I could see, smell, and hear when I wasn’t distracted searching for the perfect word. Instead, I was standing inside my story in the middle of the action just scribbling as fast as I could to keep up.

When I was done that night I had typed 11,000 words. There were errors galore. The grammar police would have locked me up and thrown away the key. That road to hell paved with adverbs? I was skipping down it with a grin stretched wide across my face. But even with all the ugliness, I had created something quite beautiful. A story… or at least part of it.

The next day I did the same. Then the next, and the next. In under two weeks my entire novel was done. It wasn’t beautiful… but it was done. The skeleton and skin were laid and now it was time to go back and slap some hair and makeup on that motley looking creature. I was Professor Henry Higgins and my novel was Eliza Doolittle. Charming, but in need of a lot of refinement.

With the story sorted and the scenes set, I was shocked how easy it was to rework my sentences and find those perfect words quite effortlessly that I struggled with before. Perhaps it was because I wasn’t trying to create a story and a sentence all at once. The story was done, now I just needed to add some flourish to it.

Since changing my approach to writing, I am now writing faster than my publisher can keep up. I finished a new novel before they even had time to read the previous one. My “get ‘er done” writing style is not only more enjoyable for me since I get to throw myself into the story, but it has made me much more effective. With this new system, writing a novel is no longer a daunting mountain to climb, but more like small hills I need to jog up and down several times. It’s still the same distance in the end, just broken up into much more manageable pieces.

When I am in a scene, I’m trying my best to write sentences that flow and won’t leave me cringing when I come back through sporting my editor hat. However, when I get tripped up over a word or a phrase I ask myself “Do I need to know this right now or can I come back and figure this out later?” If it’s the latter, which it usually is, I slap down an adverb or an ugly sentence and keep on trucking.

After a particularly long stretch of writing my latest novel, I was in a fight scene and didn’t want to lose my rhythm. When I wasn’t sure how to describe my villain, I threw a sentence in that said “He’s ugly as hell. Work in ways to describe him.” That’s a direct quote. From my novel. Well, it was a direct quote before I went back and edited it to work in a very appropriate description. The point being, rather than lose my momentum by stopping to word-craft, I followed the energy of the story and came back later to pretty it up.

If you find yourself struggling to complete your manuscript, I encourage you to try this technique. Focus on writing the best you can without slamming on the brakes to obsess over what words best describe the color of your hero’s eyes. Just call them blue and move on. Later you can send us swimming in cerulean pools frozen beneath winter’s breath. Just write. Let your story unfold and follow it without delay. When you reach the finish line, take a deep breath, pat yourself on the back, and then sit down in the sand you just shoveled and start building those sandcastles.

Katherine HastingsKatherine Hastings loves love. It’s why she writes romance novels. Getting lost writing a romantic adventure is one of her favorite past times. When she’s s not on an adventure in her mind with her characters, she can be found at her home in Wisconsin snuggling her husband, two Boston Terriers, and the world’s naughtiest cat. Two things make Katherine want to leave her happy home these days…going for rides on her dressage pony or floating at the beach in her big inflatable raft. Writing her novels while floating in the lake is one of her ultimate pleasures…that and Fried Wisconsin Cheese Curds, of course.

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2018 WisRWA Fab Five Finalists Announced

Fab 5 Contest BadgeWisRWA is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2018 Fabulous Five Contest.

Congratulations to all! The finalists are listed in Alphabetical order, and *** indicates a member of WisRWA. Winners will be announced the week of May 20, 2018.

2018 FAB FIVE FINALISTS

Contemporary
Joy Adare – Mr. Sexy Suit
Natalie Caña*** – Under a Summer Moon
Kate Courtright – It Can’t Be You
C. M. Kerwin – Tender Debt
Sandy Rhodes – Heartbeats of Home

Historical
Jeanine Englert – Queen of Hearts
Theresa Hennessey – A Matter of Manners
Kalinya Parker-Price – The Trouble With Love
Hannah Singerman – Appetites and Vices
Jane Yunker*** – The Healing Heart

Inspirational
Crystal Caudill – Counterfeit Love
Lorri Dudley – The Duke’s Refuge
Loretta Eidson – Fatal Assignment
Eilidh K. Lawrence – Returning With a Secret
C.L. Simon – The Forgiving Tree

Paranormal
Alicia Anthony – Inherent Lies
Carrie Christie – Severed Ties
Laralyn Doran – A Child of Eden
Fenley Grant – Warrior of Eden
Christine Welman*** – Legends

Romantic Suspense
Magda Cavin – Opposing Stock
Meredith Clark – Unconquered
Jeanine Englert – Against the Tide
Lisa Heartman – High Heels and Handguns
Lori Matthews – Break and Enter

Women’s Fiction
Susan Montz Adams – Alchemy of Spirit
Laura Dritlein*** – Possum Trot
Julie M. Mulligan – The Lost Sister
Maggie Smith – Not So Simple
Anne E. Terpstra – Beyond Any Experience

Young Adult/New Adult
Lani Forbes – Virtue and Valor
Eric Frederickson – Wedding Belles
Leonie Kelsall – Echoes Across Time
Wendy Lewis – What Would a Wonder Woman Do?
Jackie Rutherford – It’s all about Sam

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Promotion Thursday – April 2018

Promotion Thursday - October EditionIt’s Promotion Thursday for March. Check out where you can find our WisRWA authors this month.

Barbara Raffin will present a writing workshop on Using the Underused Senses and be signing books at Kress Family Library, De Pere, WI on April 14th at 10:30 AM-11:45.

Lois Greiman will be signing her books at the Minnesota Horse Expo April 27-29.

S.C. Mitchell will be at UntitledTown on April 21.

Sara Dahmen will be presenting at the Chanticleer Author Conference April 19-22. She will also be hosting a book event/reading on April 25 from 3-4  at Craft Books.

Valerie J. Clarizio, Virginia McCullough, Kira Shayde, S.C. Mitchell, Lisa Romdenne and Mary Grace Murphy will be at UntitledTown presenting a panel entitled  A Look at the Romance Genre and Women’s Fiction – The Genres that Outpace Themselves Year After Year.

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An Interview with Judy Roth from Custom Editing

Before sending their manuscript out into the world, some writers choose to have their work reviewed by a freelance editor. There are several advantages to having an editor join you in the revision process.

Whether you plan on self publishing, pursuing a traditional publisher, or seeking to find an agent, hiring an editor to polish your story is a powerful tool to help present yourself in a professional manner.

After authors dedicate large amounts of time and effort to their manuscripts, it can become hard to see much-needed changes.

As an author, if you are gearing toward establishing a writing career, then working with an editor is a great step toward building a solid foundation to grow from. Not only does an editor polish your work, but you learn as well throughout the editing process.

Judy Roth, Freelance Editor HeadshotI had the privilege of interviewing Judy Roth from Custom Editing. Judy opened the doors for business in 2012. She has been writing and editing for over 20 years. With a New York publishing house background she currently works with a large and diverse group of authors covering most genres of fiction and nonfiction, publishing both traditionally and independently. She takes very seriously the privilege of working with such talented writers—novice and bestselling alike. She is also a conference and writing group workshop leader and thinks she has the best job in the world!

In this article, I have asked Judy some questions about the editing process.

Why is it important for writers to hire an editor to review their manuscript before showing it to the world?

An editor has a practiced eye. She is unbiased and works for you. She has the time, whole days of it often, to devote solely to your work. She has the experience to tell you if something is or isn’t working in a constructive manner and offer concrete examples of how it can be improved if need be. An editor is on your side. She wants you to succeed, and it is her job to help you do so.

What are the most common mistakes you see in a manuscript?

Aside from basic technical errors, I think it’s less about mistakes and more about honing our craft. It’s an ongoing process—an adventure—and a good freelance editor guides authors in this process while respecting authors’ artistic vision.

At what point in the writing process is it a good idea to hire an editor?

The traditional answer is when the manuscript is as done as possible. (When that is, is an entirely different question.) But the beauty of hiring a freelance editor who works for you is that is not always the only answer. An author might want the editor to look at the first few chapters to see if the manuscript is on the right track plot wise and/or style wise. Or, returning to the question of how the writer knows if the manuscript is finished, an editor can help determine that and if need be give suggestions for how to take the story to the next level.

RevisionsHow much time should an author expect to spend on the revision process?

This is an individual process depending on many factors. In any case, it’s important to remember the editing process is as vital as the writing process. With that in mind, try to budget enough time to ensure larger developmental edits are implemented consistently throughout and sentence and paragraph structures are varied and move the story forward. Try to avoid getting bogged down by holding on to something that isn’t working. It could be a plot point that’s dear to you but just feels off in this story. It could be that one perfect sentence that makes you laugh and cry and think deep thoughts, but you’ve moved it to ten different places, and it just no longer works. Let it go—hit delete. It’s actually quite liberating, like cleaning the basement, very satisfying once it’s done, and nine out of ten times we never miss our favorite coat from high school or our kids’ first bikes. And here is the coolest part, it’s no risk. You can hit Undo. If you take it out, you can put it back. It’s your manuscript. And a tip: Keep a separate folder for those wonderful words you have deleted but don’t want to lose. I call mine Hidden Gems. Who knows, those words may come in handy in the next story, or if not you can still go visit them, laugh and cry and marvel at your genius, whenever you want. They are your words!

What advice would you give authors going through the revision process?

Try to keep an open mind and be true to yourself. It sounds obvious, but it’s dang hard to do both at the same time, especially if you are receiving critiques.

And one very practical piece of advice is whenever you make any revision, even as small as a comma change, be sure to read not only the full sentence the revision is in but at a minimum the sentence before and after it as well.

What services do you offer authors?

I edit most fiction and nonfiction. I work with authors who want to publish independently and those who want to spruce up their manuscripts for submission. I offer several different packages of full developmental edits, line edits, and proofreading. I also offer coaching services. And I love talking with writing groups, big and small—always a blast.

What is your favorite part of being an editor?

Oh gosh, I love my job. I meet such talented writers, learn something new every day. I get to look up the most outrageous things on the Internet. Chat with authors about body fluids, who wore breeches, pantaloons, or trousers when, and the merits of an em dash—love ’em. I’m a mamma bear and being an editor I’m able to nurture without ever having to send anyone to timeout, no one gets hurt, and when all is said and done authors actually say, “Thank you.” What could be better than that?

By Lisa Romdenne (w/a Lianna Hawkins)

Lisa Romdenne has been an RWA(PRO) member since November 2014 and a WisRWA member since September 2015. Currently, she serves as President of WisRWA . She writes western romance under the pen name Lianna Hawkins and is presently working on a historical western romance series.

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